William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 3-30-17

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 3-30-17

Gtps cdi id rdcigpsxri pcs rdcujit, cdg id qtaxtkt pcs ipzt udg vgpcits, qji id ltxvw pcs rdchxstg.
Ugpcrxh Qprdc

Answer to yesterday's William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: The confessional is not a torture chamber, but the place in which the Lord's mercy motivates us to do better. Pope Francis Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth. Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day. PsalmsAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: The confessional is not a torture chamber, but the place in which the Lord’s mercy motivates us to do better.
Pope Francis

 

Check out Jeff Salvino’s The Daily Salvo on WFYL 1180 AM

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 3-29-17

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 3-29-17

Hvs qcbtsggwcboz wg bch o hcfhifs qvoapsf, pih hvs dzoqs wb kvwqv hvs Zcfr’g asfqm achwjohsg ig hc rc pshhsf.
Dcds Tfobqwg

Answer to yesterday's William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: All violence consists in some people forcing others, under threat of suffering or death, to do what they do not want to do. Leo Tolstoy Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth. Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day. PsalmsAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: All violence consists in some people forcing others, under threat of suffering or death, to do what they do not want to do.
Leo Tolstoy

 

Check out Jeff Salvino’s The Daily Salvo on WFYL 1180 AM

William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 3-28-17

Money doesn’t smell is a phrase with Roman roots namely the Latin Pecunia non olet.

Urine was valuable. It was collected from public toilets and sold to tanners. The sale was taxed.

The Emporer Vespasian’s son Titus expressed his disgusted at the concept. Vespasian had him smell a gold coin. “Does it smell?” Vespasian asked? Titus said no. “Yet it comes from urine,” Vespasian said.

And from that exchange comes the phrase.

William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 3-28-17

Money doesn't smell is a phrase with Roman roots namely the Latin Pecunia non olet.

Health Care Basics Must Be Recognized By GOP

Health Care Basics Must Be Recognized By GOP — With the Republican health care reform in a mess, we’d like to suggest getting back to the basics with regard to principles and purpose.

Health insurance is not health care. “Insurance” does not insure your health, something that should be blindingly obvious. What it does is to insure that the doctors and other medical professionals get paid.

The purpose of public health is to minimize the need for care yet provide it when needed for those who cannot pay what medical professionals ask as going rates.

Minimizing the need includes things like sanitary sewer systems, draining swamps and discouraging pointless risky behavior such as that which spreads HIV. One of the first steps in getting back to basics is to stop being afraid to point this out.

When care is needed, an insurance policy is not the only means to do so. Bill Gates and Warren Buffet would be silly to have an insurance policy. They can easily cover anything that might happen to them out of pocket.

For those who aren’t billionaires, places like Philadelphia General Hospital existed in the last century to provide free care to the desperate. Of course there was no incentive to maintain them and a huge incentive to use them as dumping grounds so their demise was practically ordained.

Free markets cannot be mocked.

Step two concerning back to the basics is to recognize that health care is provided by people not governments, corporations or bureaucracies. Maximizing health care means maximizing the number of competent people who can provide it and giving them an incentive to do so to all comers.

Money is obviously going to be a factor even for the most saintly, but except for the most vile — and they are rare — it is not going to be the only factor. Social rewards are almost as important. Most successful people will discount services to those who can’t afford what they normally charge. Most will even do charity work — unless, of course, regulation and time available prevent them. You doubt this happens ponder that retired doctors can’t work part-time without still carrying malpractice insurance.

An OB/GYN pays about $20,000 per year for it.  Insurance companies will discount about 50 percent for part-timers. A $10,000 per year nut to cover would certainly put a damper on a doctor wanting to occasionally help out at a charity hospital for $50 per hour.

And no amount of money is going to keep someone from bailing out when the job stops being fun and they no longer need it. One of the biggest complaints doctors have is mandated paper work either by government or an insurance carrier.

And this gets us to insurance companies. An insurance company is a business that seeks to spread risk while making a profit. The top executives at these places easily surpass six figures. Do they earn it? Probably not but that’s not their fault. With government mandates for  features not necessarily wanted by all customers (substance abuse counseling, birth control) and restrictions on competition, they can do a lot of coasting. Call it the joys of cronyism.

Insurance companies have a use and they are not inherently bad. The Trump plan to open competition across state lines is excellent. We don’t have an objection either to a mandate for individuals to carry it. Public health has a cost and its better for people to be allowed to choose their coverage rather than leave the decision to government agents who will inevitably pocket as much of it as they can if funded via a traditional tax.

Regardless, it must be remembered that it is people who provide health care and not bureaucracies. Forgetting this while ignoring that bureaucracies inevitably become corrupt are the biggest failings of doomed Obamacare.

Health Care Basics Must Be Recognized By GOP

Health Care Basics Must Be Recognized By GOP Health Care Basics

William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 3-27-17

Who was Frankie Baker and what did he do? Well, Frankie was a she and at 2 a.m., Oct. 15, 1899 she shot her lover Allen Britt who had just won a cakewalk dance contest with Nelly Bly. Allen’s name was changed to Johnny for the song.  It should be noted that the Nelly Bly that Allen danced with was not Elizabeth Cochran Seaman the reporter from Chochran’s Mills Pa. who used that as her pen name.

Here’s Big Bill Broonzy’s version:

William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 3-27-17

Who was Frankie Baker and what did he do? Well, Frankie was a she and at 2 a.m., Oct. 15, 1899 she shot her lover Allen Britt who had just won a cakewalk dance contest with Nelly Bly.

Graham Spanier Convicted Of Endangering Children

Graham Spanier Convicted Of Endangering Children — Former Penn State President Graham Spanier was convicted, Friday, (March 24) of endangering children relating to the Jerry Sandusky coverup. It’s a misdemeanor offense albeit it carries a possible five-year prison sentence. Spanier is unlikely to get the max.

He was acquitted of felony conspiracy and a second endangerment charge. Among those who testified against him were then PSU athletic director Tim Curley and vice president Gary Schultz. Both had already pleaded guilty to an endangerment charge.

A lot of white wine sippers are still expressing sympathy for the SOB.

“I’m incredulous at the verdict,” said PSU trustee Al Lord said. “Not one victim attached Graham to this, and they still managed to come out with a guilty verdict.”

“If people of Graham’s caliber will continue to aspire to lead the great universities of this country, then we have to make sure in this age of accountability that there are protections from being wrongly accused,” said PSU trustee Bill Oldsey.

Spanier, Curley and Schultz were told that Sandusky — a professor emeritus whom Joe Paterno removed as assistant football coach in 1999 —  molested a child in a Penn State shower in 2001. The trio covered up the matter allowing Sandusky to keep an office at the school and continue his predation for another decade.

What many don’t know is that Spanier also ignored a report, also received in 2001, that PSU professor John T. Neisworth, a nationally known expert on autism, was also a child molester.

Graham Spanier Convicted Of Endangering Children
Jerry Sandusky still collects a public pension.

Something was seriously wrong in Happy Valley. District Attorney Ray Gricar, who declined to prosecute a child molestation case against Sandusky in 1998, disappeared without a trace in 2005.

And will Spanier keep his $59,000 public pension? Will Schultz keep his $330K public pension?

Well, Sandusky still gets his.

Graham Spanier Convicted Of Endangering Children

 

 

 

Content Of Character

Content Of Character — Today is Martin Luther King Jr. Day. 

Rev. King probably would have been proud to be called an Uncle Tom.

Content Of CharacterHere is the text of his wonderful “I Have A Dream” speech given, Aug. 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial. Note the phrases praising God, The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we’ve come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we’ve come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the “unalienable Rights” of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.”

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we’ve come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.

We cannot turn back.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating: “For Whites Only.” We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until “justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”¹

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. And some of you have come from areas where your quest — quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” — one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; “and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.”2

This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with.

With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

And this will be the day — this will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning:

My country ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.

Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride,

From every mountainside, let freedom ring!

And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.

And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.

Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.

Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.

But not only that:

Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.

From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:

                Free at last! Free at last!

                Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!3

Content Of Character

William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 7-22-16

second deadliest man
So, who was the second deadliest dog?

Who were the deadliest and second deadliest man alive? That would be John Timothy “Count Dante” Keehan and his sidekick Douglas Dwyer. They were arrested on July 22, 1965 in Chicago when they tried to tape dynamite caps to a rival dojo. Both were under the influence of alcohol. Keehan would advertise his skills in comic books.

 

Second deadliest man –William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 7-22-16

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 7-19-16

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 7-19-16

Efemzfcvetv zj r gfnviwlc reu aljk nvrgfe. nyzty tlkj nzkyflk nfleuzex reu veefscvj kyv dre nyf nzvcuj zk. Zk zj r jnfiu kyrk yvrcj.
Drikze Clkyvi Bzex, Ai.

Answer to yesterday's William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: Who goes for a day in the woods should bring bread for a week. Czech ProverbSing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth. Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day. PsalmsAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: Who goes for a day in the woods should bring bread for a week.
Czech Proverb

 

Check out Jeff Salvino’s The Daily Salvo on WFYL 1180 AM