William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 4-23-17

Did any fighting occur in England during the American Revolution? Yes, John Paul Jones raided the English town of Whitehaven on April 23, 1778. He planned to set it afire. It was not a success. The fuel ran out in the lanterns that meant to start the blaze and when raiders were sent to loot a pub for more fuel, they decided to drink instead.

Some also argue that Jones’ crew was reluctant to set fire to the homes of the poor.

William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 4-23-17

Did any fighting occur in England during the American Revolution? Yes, John Paul Jones raided the English town of Whitehaven on April 23, 1778. He planned to set it afire. It was not a success.

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 4-23-17

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 4-23-17

Qbiypyl ivmylpym nby qchx qcff hin miq; uhx qbiypyl lyaulxm nby wfioxm qcff hin lyuj.
Ywwfymcumnym

Answer to yesterday's William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: In the rich world, the environmental situation has improved dramatically. In the United States, the most important environmental indicator, particulate air pollution, has been cut by more than half since 1955, rivers and coastal waters have dramatically improved, and forests are increasing. Bjorn Lomborg Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth. Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day. PsalmsAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: In the rich world, the environmental situation has improved dramatically. In the United States, the most important environmental indicator, particulate air pollution, has been cut by more than half since 1955, rivers and coastal waters have dramatically improved, and forests are increasing.
Bjorn Lomborg

 

Check out the Dom Giordano Show on WPHT 1210 AM

Philly Taxed City And Why Can’t We Save The SS United States?

Philly Taxed City And Why Can’t We Save The SS United States?

By Chris Freind Philly Taxed City

In 1979, Chicago’s streets weren’t adequately plowed after a snowstorm. As a result, Mayor Michael Bilandic lost his bid for re-election. After similar snowstorms in Philadelphia, where the streets were deplorable for days, almost 80 percent of voters said “job well done” to then-Mayor Michael Nutter, and rewarded him with another term.

That type of passive neglect has been pervasive in Philadelphia for decades, cementing the city’s reputation as one with virtually no promise of a renaissance-like turnaround. And the numbers bear that out.

A study by the Pew Charitable Trust found that many with the means to leave the city do, as almost 300,000 white residents (one-third of that population) have fled over the last 25 years. Another Pew study showed that, by a large margin, more families with children are leaving the city than coming in. Those who can’t flee get further crushed by an incompetent government.

This is Philadelphia, birthplace of America. It doesn’t, and shouldn’t, have to be this way.

An acquaintance from London recently arrived in Philadelphia for the first time. Like any good tour guide, this author whisked him off for cheesesteaks at both Pat’s and Geno’s in South Philadelphia. They did not disappoint.

But so much else did.

Since it’s human nature to gloss over that which has become all too familiar, it often takes someone else’s perspective to “see” what’s really there. And after driving around the city, what’s “there” was, on the whole, undesirable. Graffiti. Homelessness. Unkempt houses. A dearth of green space. Malfunctioning parking meters. Trash. Poverty. Incompetence. And trash.

It’s downright embarrassing. And quite frankly, people should be sick of it.

Try talking about how “great” Philadelphia is, and truth be told, it feels more like we’re convincing ourselves rather than impressing guests. This isn’t a new phenomenon, but one that has plagued us for years.

We should have boldly emerged from the shadow of our big brother to the north and the nation’s capital to the south to become a unique destination in our own right, not an also-ran town that serves merely as a pit stop on the way to “better” places.

We should be a world-class city. But we’re not.

Will things ever change? Can people jettison their inferiority complex born of perpetual malaise, and replace it with bona fide pride? Hopefully, but not likely, because Philadelphia has, for so long, been victimized by a toxic disease that destroys the very essence of its people: Impotent leadership.

Since London is in a class by itself, let’s look at Boston – another older, East Coast city – to see why it’s a thriving, vibrant metropolis, while Philly remains stagnant. And for the record, you know things are bad when you’re getting whipped by a city that happens to be in the most liberal state in the country.

Above all, Philadelphia kills itself by being the highest-taxed city in America (cumulatively), levying taxes on sales (2 percent higher than the rest of Pennsylvania), amusements, parking, business income and receipts, hotel rooms, cigarettes, liquor, use and occupancy, net profits, vehicle rental, outdoor advertising, trash, real estate, and, of course, the city wage tax. And let’s not forget the new soda tax. It’s already cost hundreds of jobs, with thousands more to follow, because people are now shopping outside the city – not just for soda, but for all their food needs, decimating the city’s mom-and-pop grocery stores.

Higher taxes result in fewer residents, businesses, and jobs, and, therefore, produce less revenue. In turn, that leads to diminished city services, including an underfunded fire department – which, we just learned, was the primary reason why a firefighter tragically died.

Philadelphia owns the highest or near-highest rates of poverty, homelessness, violence and murder; its education system produces abysmal results; its city pension is catastrophically underfunded; and opening a business is fraught with bureaucracy, and, some say, extortion – both “legal” and otherwise.

Philadelphia doesn’t have the luxury of being Washington or New York, where being downtown is a necessity, so the margin of error for Philly’s leaders is extremely small. And for those empty nesters and white-collar types who enjoy living in Center City, they are one mugging away from packing it up and moving back to the suburbs.

But rather than embarking on a course that would revive the city, Mayor Jim Kenney and City Council have done what the politicians always do: Put the screws to the residents who can’t afford to vote with their feet.

Compare that to Beantown. Sure, it has its share of taxes, but it educational product is significantly better, and its crime rate lower. Granted, it’s a smaller city, but comparatively, the rates are light years apart.

Boston has made huge strides in preserving green space and cleaning up pollution (such as the now-pristine Boston Harbor), with parks throughout the city. Its public transportation is top notch, and its infrastructure is being improved at an aggressive pace. And the entire downtown area is remarkably clean.

Knowing that quality of life is critical to maintaining a productive workforce, Boston has made its waterfronts safe meccas for entertainment, dining, shopping, and a host of outdoor activities. Contrast that to Fairmount Park, which while beautiful, is shady in many parts – and not from the trees. And for decades, we’ve heard nothing but empty promises from Philadelphia’s leaders about how both the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers – Penn’s Landing in particular – would be fully developed. The failure to do this has resulted in a colossal waste of prime space. And the bike/walking path that was finally constructed along a stretch of the Schuylkill? Plagued by muggings and violence.

So how is it that so many other cities successfully develop much smaller waterways, making them fantastic tourist magnets, such as in Cincinnati and San Antonio, yet Philadelphia, with not one but two major river systems, hasn’t done squat with either one?

Philadelphia obviously isn’t going to bulldoze skyscrapers to make way for green space and riverwalks. But in areas where its leaders could have exercised bold vision, they failed. One of their biggest blunders was ignoring the immensely successful model of “neighborhood” ballparks, where fans stream into local pubs and shops before and after games, creating a lucrative spinoff effect – such as Wrigley Field, Fenway Park, and newer ones in Baltimore, Cincinnati and Denver. Instead, Philly’s leaders chose to build in the middle of nowhere. As a result, the majority of fans never spend a dime outside the ballpark. A new baseball stadium near 30th Street should have been the goose that laid the golden egg, but leaders were too chicken to do the right thing.

Same for the Navy Yard, which, with its vast acreage, could be developed into a world-class entertainment facility, connected to Center City by monorail or ferry. Yet it sits unused, just another dream floating away while the competition gets it right.

Another missed opportunity is the brimming-with-potential S.S. United States – once the fastest ocean liner in the world. Other cities’ leaders would have done whatever was necessary to make her a first-class attraction, such as the Queen Mary in Long Beach, Calif. She could be a mega casino hotel, or filled with museums, shops and restaurants. But instead, she rusts away on the Delaware, seemingly destined for the junkyard while political leaders do nothing.

It is beyond frustrating to visit other cities that have their act together, knowing that Philadelphia’s potential outranks damn near all of them. But potential doesn’t get the job done. Rolling up the sleeves and putting in the hard work does. Contrary to the fairy-tale fluff spewed at press conferences, Philadelphia is not on a path to prosperity. And because of its failed leadership – and a population that no longer demands greatness – more folks will leave, and Philadelphia will continue its sad decline.

Philadelphia is better than that, and Philadelphians deserve more. It’s time to demand backbone from our leaders so that Philly can be the world-class city it was born to be.

As Benjamin Franklin so presciently said: “Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning.”

Hey City Hall – anyone listening?

Philly Taxed City And Why Can’t We Save The SS United States?

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 4-22-17

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 4-22-17

Bg max kbva phkew, max xgobkhgfxgmte lbmntmbhg atl bfikhoxw wktftmbvteer. Bg max Ngbmxw Lmtmxl, max fhlm bfihkmtgm xgobkhgfxgmte bgwbvtmhk, itkmbvnetmx tbk iheenmbhg, atl uxxg vnm ur fhkx matg atey lbgvx 1955, kboxkl tgw vhtlmte ptmxkl atox wktftmbvteer bfikhoxw, tgw yhkxlml tkx bgvkxtlbgz.
Uchkg Ehfuhkz

Answer to yesterday's William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: The story of Romulus and Remus being suckled by a wolf is not a meaningless fable. Henry David Thoreau Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth. Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day. PsalmsAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: The story of Romulus and Remus being suckled by a wolf is not a meaningless fable.
Henry David Thoreau

 

Read Phil Heron at the Delaware County Daily Times

William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 4-21-17

What do Bangkok and Rome have in common? Both were founded on April 21.  Of course, Rome, which was founded in 753 B.C. is 2535 years older. Bangkok’s original name was Rattanakosin. Rome was always Rome.

Happy birthday cities.

William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 4-21-17

What do Bangkok and Rome have in common? Both were founded on April 21. Of course, Rome, which was founded in 753 B.C. is 2535 years older. Bangkok's original name was Rattanakosin. Rome was always Rome.

Antique Tech Snarls Harrisburg

Antique Tech Snarls Harrisburg

Antique Tech Snarls HarrisburgBy Sen. Scott Wagner

Last Friday, the Central Penn Business Journal published an article titled: “Government contracting: Old tech dies hard.”

The first sentence describes how out-dated a computer system and process is in Harrisburg.

“The department that processes Pennsylvania’s unemployment claims relies on a computer system so old that, if it were a human being, it would qualify for membership in AARP.”

Over the last 10 years, over $400 million was spent on this computer system upgrade. The $400 million was wasted. We still have a 50-year-old computer system.

This is an absolute disgrace – $400 million of taxpayer money down the drain. Has anybody been held accountable?in the private sector world, anyone involved in the waste of this amount of money without absolutely zero results to show for the money spent would be fired.

I feel confident making the statement that over the last 10 years Harrisburg has wasted several billion dollars on similar projects.

This type of outdated technology is everywhere in state government.

A reasonable person would ask how Pennsylvania state government could be so outdated with it’s computer systems.

It is very simple – Governors come and go, agency secretaries come and go, and entrenched career bureaucrats stay below the radar screen and allow the status quo thinking to continue.

I have visited several state agencies over the last three years and have talked to the people doing the real work, and they have story after story of their frustration.

These people want to do the right thing and fully know that money is being wasted, or have ideas that could save money, but their ideas fall on deaf ears or are told to look the other way.

Legislators regularly pass bills that involve funding for various initiatives. After the voting is over, after the money moves to a specific department, there is no oversight and zero accountability.

This type of culture has to change in Harrisburg. Outright wasting of money has to stop. Changing the culture in Harrisburg will require a person with strong  leadership  skills  in the Governor’s office.

For over 35 years, I have started several private sector businesses from scratch and have worked with many resources and professionals along with the management teams at these companies to ensure that we have the latest tools and technology in place that allow these businesses to be able to stay in front of all the changes that we have faced over the years in order to survive in a highly competitive business environment.

I have repeatedly stated before, that many employees in state government in Harrisburg are starving for leadership and they want to be part of a culture change.

When I become the next Governor of Pennsylvania, I look forward to working with the people who want to be part of making Pennsylvania even greater!

Antique Tech Snarls Harrisburg

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 4-21-17

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 4-21-17

Lzw klgjq gx Jgemdmk sfv Jwemk twafy kmucdwv tq s ogdx ak fgl s ewsfafydwkk xstdw.
Zwfjq Vsnav Lzgjwsm

Answer to yesterday's William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: Surely God would not have created such a being as man, with an ability to grasp the infinite, to exist only for a day! No, no, man was made for immortality. Abraham Lincoln Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth. Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day. PsalmsAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: Surely God would not have created such a being as man, with an ability to grasp the infinite, to exist only for a day! No, no, man was made for immortality.
Abraham Lincoln

 

Check out Kim Kennedy’s It’s A New Day on WFYL 1180 AM

Sauerkraut Pierogi Sale At HMB

Holy Myrrh-Bearers Eastern Catholic Church is having a special sauerkraut pierogi sale. Cost is $10 per dozen. Orders must be placed by Saturday, April 23, by calling 610-544-1215 or emailing HMBChurch@verizon.net.

Pick-up is April 28 at the church, 900 Fairview Rd
Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, PA 19081.

Sauerkraut Pierogi Sale At HMB