Sandy Cleanup Contractor Tips

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvania residents were left without power and with storm cleanup related to fallen trees, power lines and other debris. If you need to hire someone to make repairs to your home or property, Pennsylvania has a law in place to help ensure you are hiring a legitimate contractor, reports State Rep. Jim Cox (R-129)

The Home Improvement Consumer Protection Act of 2008 establishes a mandatory registration program for contractors who offer or perform home improvements in Pennsylvania. It establishes minimum insurance requirements for contractors; requires contractors to provide their registration number in their ads and contracts; establishes required contract terms for home improvement contracts; prohibits unfair business practices; and creates a criminal penalty for home improvement fraud.

The Office of Attorney General also offers these tips to avoid unscrupulous contractors:

Never enter into a repair or improvement project without a written contract that includes a start and finish date and a three-day right-to-cancel notice.

Never sign a blank contract, or one that does not include all the costs and supplies.

Never hire a contractor who does not have a business card or local phone number and address.

Never make final payment until you are completely satisfied with the work performed.

Any good written contract includes the type, quality and warranty of materials to be used and outlines all the financial terms and payment schedules. It also includes a complete description of the work to be done and a guarantee that old materials and debris will be removed.

For more information on hiring a good contractor and avoiding scams, visit www.attorneygeneral.gov/hiccon.aspx.

Sandy Cleanup Contractor Tips

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 12:38 p.m. Oct. 29, 2012

This serene shot of the creek that runs beneath North Rolling Road in Springfield Pa. was taken at 12:38 p.m., today, Oct. 29. If  the amount rain expected with Hurricane Sandy arrives  there is a good likelihood it will flood closing the road.

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 12:38 p.m. Oct. 29, 2012
Springfield Township, however, is being proactive keeping leaves from clogging the drainage holes as has occurred in the past. Maybe the road will stay open.
Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 5:17 p.m. Oct. 29, 2012

Sandy at 5:17 p.m. in Springfield, Pa — about 70 miles west of the storm’s expected 8 p.m. landfall at Atlantic City. The township experienced its first power outage shortly after. It lasted less than a minute.
Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 7:53 p.m. Oct. 29, 2012
Sciarrino’s Pizza on Brookside Road, Springfield, Pa. remains open at 7:53 p.m., Oct. 29, which is about the time of Sandy’s landfall on the Jersey Shore.

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 7:55 p.m. Oct. 29, 2012

The empty streets of Springfield at 7:55 p.m., Oct. 29 looking south on Springfield Road towards Brookside Road. The rain had stopped but wind had significantly picked up. On the odd side of Windsor Circle one small tree had been blown over and large branches from another had been blown into the street.

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 10:48 p.m. Oct. 29, 2012

This spruce fell from the Springfield Township traffic island onto the wall at 18 Windsor Circle blocking island’s southern path along with the northern Windsor Circle entrance. It was photographed at 10:46 p.m. It was the second spruce to fall from the island in three months.

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 10:52 p.m. Oct. 29, 2012

Another blurry nighttime view of the fallen spruce. A far greater amount of damaged occurred across the street when a large tree fell from 33 N. Rolling Road onto the roof of 25 N. Rolling Road. Kudos to the Springfield road crews who were cutting up the spruce at 1:25 a.m.

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 9:45 a.m. Oct. 30, 2012

The aftermath: The scene at 33 N. Rolling Road (left) and 25 N. Rolling Road, Springfield, Pa., the morning of Oct. 30. Rain was still falling but the wind had significantly dropped.

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 1:59 p.m. Oct. 30, 2012

Another view of the tree that fell on 25 N. Rolling Road.

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 2:02 p.m. Oct. 30, 2012

Springfield Township workers remove the fallen spruce tree from the Windsor Circle/Rolling Road traffic island about 2 p.m., Oct. 30.

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay 1:48 p.m. Oct. 30, 2012

The rain is gone, the high winds are now a light breeze and here is the stream that runs beneath North Rolling Road at 1:48 p.m., Oct. 30.

Hurricane Sandy Springfield Photo Essay