Charter School Salvation In NOLA

The black clouds of Hurricane Katrina had a pretty bright silver lining. Charter School Salvation In NOLA Drastic measures were required after the storm hit a decade ago to get the children of New Orleans back in the classroom so the public education system -- which was one of the nation's worst -- was scrapped and replaced with one based on charter schools

Drastic measures were required after the storm hit a decade ago to get the children of New Orleans back in the classroom so the public education system — which was one of the nation’s worst — was scrapped and replaced with one based on charter schools.

By every measure things have gotten better.

Naturally, the stooges of the teachers union are upset but then they really don’t care about the kids now, do they?

If a decentralized, parental choice based charter school system can improve education for poor black kids it can certainly do the same for middle class white ones.

It should be noted that rich liberal kids already benefit from school choice.

Ben Howe of Redstate.com has created a documentary about it and can be seen below.

Charter School Salvation In NOLA

Failing Schools Enabled By Gov. Wolf

By Leo Knepper Failing Schools Enabled By Gov. Wolf

“…I’m in this spot where I have to call the school that failed my kids and re-enroll them…I’m heartbroken over this.”

That quote comes from Amy Millar via a Philadelphia Inquirer story on the State Education Department’s recent action to “clarify” what services cyber-charter schools can offer. According to the article, two of Ms. Millar’s children have special education needs. However, her children have flourished at the Education Plus Academy Cyber Charter School (Ed Plus).

What did Ed Plus do to bring the wrath of the state education bureaucracy down on their heads? They offered their students services like art, gym, and “face-to-face” learning opportunities at their learning centers. In other words, they looked at the needs of their students and provided for them. The State Department of Education evidently frowns on the hybrid model used by Ed Plus. As a result parents like Ms. Millard will be forced to send their children back to schools that were failing to meet their needs in the first place.

Although the Governor purports to want “quality” education for all. His administration’s actions in this and other cases clearly illustrate that is not entirely accurate. The Governor’s interest is in making sure that his patrons at the teachers’ union are happy and that there is as little competition as possible in the public education sphere.

If the Wolf administration was interested in ensuring every child received a quality education, they would be applauding Ed Plus. Furthermore, they would be examining what that school is doing differently and seeing how it might be replicated in other schools. The Department of Education should be looking at how they could make it easier for others schools to provide the same education experience. Instead, they seem more interested in erecting barriers to a quality education.

Mr. Knepper is with Citizens Alliance of Pennsylvania

Failing Schools Enabled By Gov. Wolf

Wolf Mocks Philly Parents

Wolf Mocks Philly Parents
Gov. Tom Wolf mocks Philly parents with his charter school opposition.

Democrat Gov. Tom Wolf, a man bought and paid for by the teachers unions, stripped Bill Green of his chairmanship of the Philadelphia School Reform Commission, Sunday night, March 1. Why? Because Green heard the pleas of Philly parents and allowed for  five new charter schools.

This was in defiance of Wolf and the unions who wanted no new ones.

Of the school district’s, 206,567 pupils, 64,301 now attend charter schools.

There is a waiting list of thousands more that has been estimated at 40,000.

The objection of Wolf and his cronies is that the charter school’s take money from the Philadelphia School District. The answer to this is that the Philadelphia School District prevents parents from sending their children to schools where they won’t be pushed around, threatened, mocked for “acting white” and actually get an education.

When are the residents of Philadelphia going to wake up to the reality that the Democrat Party is anything but their friend?

There is an opportunity here for the Republicans.

Wolf Mocks Philly Parents

 

Philly Charter School Beats Springfield

The Pennsylvania Department of Education has launched paschoolperformance.org giving residents greater access to the balance sheets of Pennsylvania’s schools, says State Rep. Jim Cox (R-129).

He says the website shows school spending by district, including total revenue, total expenditures, per-pupil expenditures and average staff salaries, albeit we could not find the average staff salaries and we had to figure out the per-pupil expenditures ourselves.

The website also tracks charter and cyber charter schools, and comprehensive career and technology centers, Cox says.

And it includes academic performance.

We decided to have some fun with it comparing Philadelphia Academy Charter School with the Springfield School District  in Delaware County.

Philadelphia Academy spends $9.475 million on instruction for 1,180 pupils which is $8,029 per pupil.

Springfield spends $34,054,290 for 3,907 pupils or $8,716 per pupil.

The extra $687 per pupil — which translates to $2,684,109 per year to the taxpayer — isn’t something to sneeze at but if it means more engineers and doctors and a cure for cancer who will object, right?

Some cynic here might chime in and and ask what if it doesn’t, well, we’ll get to that.

Philadelphia Academy’s total spending is $15,598,815 or $13,219 per pupil.

Springfield’s is $59,441,901 or $15,214 per pupil.

Philly Charter School Beats Springfield High SchoolThat’s $1,995 more per pupil which adds up to $7,794,465 per year to the taxpayer. While salaries to attract great teachers might be justifiable, one can see where the extra money for non-instructional use and support might make someone laid off or living on a fixed income feel a mite resentful.

But if a cure for cancer is coming, it is worth it, right?

Which gets us to the academics.

We should note here that 33 percent of Philadelphia Academy’s pupil population is “economically disadvantaged” with 20.76 percent in special education compared to 14.5 percent “economically disadvantaged” with 15.87 percent in special education for Springfield.

The school performance of Philadelphia Academy is higher than Springfield High School for mathematics/algebra (84.22 percent proficient or advanced on PSSA to 75.27) and science/biology (68.71 percent to 42.96) although SHS wins on reading/literature (87.36 percent to 77.28)

Regarding elementary education specifically, at least with regard to reading, Springfield wins with 89.7 percent of Scenic Hills pupils and 83.65 percent of Sabold’s pupils being  proficient or advanced on reading as per the PSSA while  Philadelphia Academy’s score was 80.6 percent.

We kind of think the great engineers and doctors and the cure for cancer are more likely to come out of Philadelphia Academy.

Really Springfield, a 42.96 percent proficiency in science/biology?

Hey, let’s build a $144 million Taj Mahal. That’ll fix it.

Philly Charter School Beats Springfield

Philly Charter School Beats Springfield
As per paschoolperformance.org a Philly charter school beats Springfield public school district.

Yes, a Philly charter school beats a highly regarded suburban school district on several metrics.

And Philly charter school Philadelphia Academy Beats Springfield

School Choice Kickoff Is Jan. 22

Choice Media‘s Philadelphia Kickoff of National School Choice Week is 9 -11 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 22, from 9-11 a.m. at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, reports Commonwealth Foundation..

The event includes breakfast and a screening of The Ticket, a documentary that takes viewers on a historic whistlestop train tour across the country, featuring different forms of school choice and the children served.

Following the documentary, a distinguished panel of experts — including Commonwealth Foundation’s James Paul — will lead a conversation about school choice.

The other panelists are:

Bob Bowdon – director of The Ticket and Executive Director of Choice Media
David Hardy – spokesman for PhillySchoolChoice.com
Ina Lipman – executive director of Children’s Scholarship Fund Philadelphia
Mike Wang – managing mirector of the Philadelphia School Partnership

Tickets are  $1 plus a $1.04 service charge and  can be acquired here.

School Choice Kickoff Is Jan. 22

School Choice Kickoff Is Jan. 22

 

Good New Year’s News

Matthew Brouillette of Commonwealth Foundation informs us that for the first time in seven years new charter school applications  — there are 40 of them — are under review in Philadelphia.

This gives a bit of hope to those poor kids stuck on waiting lists.

He notes that in October, legislation was passed in October allowing thousands of more kids to attend a school of their parents choice.

You think school choice is bad thing? Then just imagine if you had to use the supermarket/electrician/lawyer/doctor the government picked for you.

School choice is a good thing just as being able to choose your supermarket its.

Brouillette also tells us some not-so-good New Year’s news. Seven Pennsylvania government union PACs have shoveled $7.6  million to candidates in 2013-14. This is an increase of 53 percent in just two years.

Brouillette notes that this money comes from dues collected at taxpayer expense as per a corrupt law.

Good New Year's News

Good New Year’s News

Blaine Amendments Hurt Children

Lindsey Burke of the Heritage Foundation and Breitbart News’ Jarrett Stepman have released a peer-reviewed article in with the Journal of School Choice outlining the impact of how obsolete laws inspired by vehement anti-Catholicism are impacting the school choice movement and leaving millions of children stuck in bad schools or with bad teachers.

The laws were passed in the late 19th century and are generally known as “Blaine Amendments” after Maine Congressman and Speaker of the House James G. Blaine who promoted them.

A type of Blaine Amendment is on the books in 38 states including Pennsylvania.

Hat tip Tom Coniglia

Blaine Amendments Hurt Children

Blaine Amendments Hurt Children

 

Water Valley Beating Shows School Choice Need

The brutal beating of 13-year-old Destiny Hughes, a seventh grader at Water Valley High School in Mississippi, was caught on camera by fellow students, who it should be noted also stopped the assault as the teachers must have been otherwise preoccupied.

“You know, the school has a policy against bullying and violence, but if they’re not going to enforce it, it’s not worth the paper it’s printed on,” said Destiny’s mother, Rhonda, who pointed out that her daughter had had numerous run ins with the girl prior to the assault captured on camera.

Mrs. Hughes is now suing the school and said she will be homeschooling her children.

Here is the video of the assault that originally ran on on WTVA in Tupelo.

If parents had the power to fire their schools — and teachers — this sort of thing would be far less frequent as those getting the money would have a strong incentive to nip it in the bud.

It should further be noted that school choice is not the end of public education as by definition voucher dollars would be tax dollars. Vouchers would expand education and increase its quality actually.

Further, if one opposes school choice ask yourself this: If parents cannot be trusted to choose their children’s teachers why can they be trusted to vote?

If one is honest one will conclude that since they can be trusted to vote (and choose their children’s doctors and food products and clothing), then then can be trusted to choose their children’s teachers and schools

Water Valley Beating Shows School Choice Need

Water Valley Beating Shows School Choice Need

 

Hat tip IJReview

Act 194 Makes Trade Schools EITC Eligible

Pennsylvania House Bill 91, was signed into law as Act 194 of 2014 on Oct. 31 by Gov. Tom Corbett.

The new law gives public career and technical schools eligibility to participate in two nationally acclaimed tax credit programs, the state Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) and Opportunity Scholarship Tax Credit (OSTC) programs, says State Rep. Jim Cox (R-129)

The EITC and OSTC programs allow eligible businesses that contribute to scholarship organizations affiliated with public or private schools to receive a tax credit equal to 75 percent of its contribution, up to a maximum of $750,000 per taxable year. The OSTC program targets students residing within the boundaries of low-achieving schools.

“Many of Pennsylvania’s 82 career and technical schools have limited options to receive scholarship donations,” said Cox. “This new law makes them eligible to take part in these popular tax credit programs that will improve the educational experience for students on a technical career path.”

Act 194 Makes Trade Schools EITC Eligible

Act 194 Makes Trade Schools EITC Eligible

HB 91 Expands School Choice In Pa

HB 91, which expands Pennsylvania’s Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) and Opportunity Scholarship Tax Credit (OSTC) programs, has overwhelmingly passed the General Assembly and awaits Gov. Corbett’s signature, reports State Rep. Jim Cox (R-129).

The bill also allows the credits for the programs to be shared based on need.

The EITC and OSTC provide businesses a tax credit of up to 90 percent for up to $750,000 if they contribute to a scholarship organization, an educational improvement organization, and/or a pre-kindergarten scholarship organization.

The tax credit does not apply to property taxes.

The money is used to fund innovations in public schools and provide tuition assistance in the form of scholarships to eligible students residing within the boundaries of a low-achieving school to attend another public school outside of their district or nonpublic school.

The initial passage of the bill in the House on June 24, 2013 was 198-0.  The passage in the Senate on Oct. 15, 2014 was 48-0. The concurrence in the House on Oct. 20 was 193-4 with the dissenters being Mike Carroll of the 118th District, Pamela DeLissio of the 194th District, Phyllis Mundy of the 120th District and Eddie Day Pashinski  of the 121st District.

HB 91 Expands School Choice In Pa

 

HB 91 Expands School Choice In Pa