Content Of Character

Content Of Character — Today is Martin Luther King Jr. Day. 

Rev. King probably would have been proud to be called an Uncle Tom.

Content Of CharacterHere is the text of his wonderful “I Have A Dream” speech given, Aug. 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial. Note the phrases praising God, The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we’ve come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we’ve come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the “unalienable Rights” of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.”

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we’ve come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.

We cannot turn back.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating: “For Whites Only.” We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until “justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”¹

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. And some of you have come from areas where your quest — quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” — one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; “and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.”2

This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with.

With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

And this will be the day — this will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning:

My country ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.

Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride,

From every mountainside, let freedom ring!

And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.

And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.

Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.

Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.

But not only that:

Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.

From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:

                Free at last! Free at last!

                Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!3

Content Of Character

George Ciccariello-Maher Self Loathing Is Not Funny

George Ciccariello-Maher Self Loathing Is Not Funny — Drexel history assistant professor George Ciccariello-Maher tweeted on Christmas Eve: “All I want for Christmas is White Genocide”.

He doubled down on the holiday itself tweeting: “To clarify: when the whites were massacred during the Haitian revolution, that was a good thing indeed.”

Now the poor little snowflake is getting all sorts of grief from the general citizenry, and his employer has scheduled a meeting with him after calling what he did “utterly reprehensible” and “deeply disturbing”.

The  consequences of Ciccariello-Maher’s actions should be handled in a business-like and impersonal way, much as a plumbing firm would if it became known that one of its employees didn’t know how to change a washer.

Does this guy being on the faculty make it more or less likely for parents to shell out $52,037 per year — not counting room and board — to send their kid to this private institution in West Philadelphia?

George Ciccariello-Maher Self Loathing Is Not Funny

Just business, Georgie. You  would find a better way of assuaging your white guilt anyway. How about getting a job with the city school district and teaching 10th graders at MLK?  OK, bad idea as it would be very unfair to the kids. How, about getting a janitorial job there and cleaning the toilets? There you go, guilt problem solved and you don’t screw up any lives by professing garbage.

By the way, the Haitian genocide of 1804 and Nat Turner’s Rebellion in 1831 did a pretty good job of squelching abolitionist movements in states with large slave populations and leading to misery that could have been ended decades earlier than it was.

Of course, as a history professor you knew that right? LOL.

George Ciccariello-Maher Self Loathing Is Not Funny

Morgan State Professor Sows Division

Morgan State Professor Sows Division –Lawrence Brown, an assistant professor in the Public Health Department at Morgan State University in Baltimore, thinks of himself as an oppressed black man.

He says “white allies should deposit their unearned wealth into black accounts“.

Well, considering his obviously unearned salary is funded by tax dollars from “white allies”, one kind of wonders what more does he want.

Brown is a childish idiot who is looking for attention by saying shocking things with the expectation of praise from other childish idiots.

He is not fit to hold a respected title.

Hopefully, the Trump administration takes a far harder line on public funds for “higher” education and limits disbursement to fields that can show objective results, or at least not sent to people sowing division like this guy. Morgan State Professor Sows Division

By the way, the phrase “white privilege’ so beloved by those who want to banish thought should be banished itself and replaced with “father privilege”.  Children raised in homes where a loving father is present are far more likely to to have success i.e. become “privileged” than those who are not. When 70 percent of human beings who describe themselves as “black” are raised in homes sans father, far fewer will end up “privileged” than from groups were most are raised in traditional families.

We don’t know much about “Professor” Brown’s background but if one had to bet, the safe bet is that he doesn’t have father privilege.

Hat tip Mary Ellen.

Morgan State Professor Sows Division

 

Tom Wolf Backed Racist York Dem

Tom Wolf Backed Racist York Dem — The Washington Post is continuing its politics of hate and division against  President-elect Donald Trump despite owner Jeff Bezos’ desperate offer of the peace pipe.

Yesterday, Nov. 11, the rag carried a story about and ran on its website a video of a teenager shouting “white power” in York, Pa. The kid was in proximity to a Trump sign.

Tom Wolf Backed Racist York Dem
Charlie Robertson’s campaign manager

The story mentioned the 1969 York Race Riot and brought up how York Mayor Charles “Charlie” H. Robertson was charged in 2001, while in office, with the murder of a black women due to actions he committed as a young police officer during the riot. Robertson was acquitted albeit there didn’t seem to be a defense that he was a noble defender of law and justice for all, and in fact, admitted to shouting a racial slur.

Which gets us back to the WaPo propaganda piece. The Post doesn’t mention Robertson’s party which is Democrat. Far more damning, the Post failed to note that his campaign manager and political supporter was Gov. Tom Wolf.

It is not the Trump people who back racists. Wolf, if you don’t know, is a very “progressive” Democrat.

Hat tip Ted Meehan

Tom Wolf Backed Racist York Dem

 

 

Democrat Corruption Pandering Finally Called Out

Democrat Corruption Pandering Finally Called Out — Donald Trump spoke last night, Aug. 16, in West Bend, Wis., just outside riot-torn Milwaukee.

Democrat Corruption Pandering Finally Called OutWhat he said is worth reading again. It’s worth reading a thousand times, in fact, and making every decent Democrat you know read it:

The other party – the Democratic Party – nominated the personification of special interest corruption. The Democratic Party rigged the nomination to give it to Hillary Clinton, thus giving the soul of their party this year to the special interests.

I am running to listen to your voice, to hear your cries for help. The quiet voices in our society, not the loudest demonstrators, need to have their demands heard.

Jobs. Safety. Opportunity. Fair and equal representation.

We reject the bigotry of Hillary Clinton which panders to and talks down to communities of color and sees them only as votes, not as individual human beings worthy of a better future. She doesn’t care at all about the hurting people of this country, or the suffering she has caused them.

The African-American community has been taken for granted for decades by the Democratic Party. It’s time to break with the failures of the past – I want to offer Americans a new future.

It is time for rule by the people, not rule by special interests.

Every insider, getting rich off of our broken system, is throwing money at Hillary Clinton.

The hedge fund managers, the Wall Street investors, the professional political class.

It’s the powerful protecting the powerful.

Insiders fighting for insiders.

I am fighting for you.

Democrat Corruption Pandering Finally Called Out

Rich Black Hypocrisy In Tinsel Town

Rich Black Hypocrisy In Tinsel Town

By Chris Freind Rich Black Hypocrisy In Tinsel Town

Sometimes life imitates art so perfectly that even Hollywood couldn’t script it.

Now is such a time. And how ironic.

Hollywood – long perceived as a bastion of unwavering liberalism – is now being accused of playing the race card, employing discrimination in how Academy Awards nominees were selected, or, more accurately, not selected.

Of the 20 actors nominated for an Oscar this year, none are black, for the second consecutive year.

Now director Spike Lee (whose movie wasn’t nominated) and actress Jada Pinkett Smith (whose husband Will Smith was not nominated) are boycotting the award show and asking others, especially the black acting community, to do likewise.

And here is where this saga jumps the rails. Lee and Smith are shooting from the hip more than John Wayne, ignoring the concept of “presumed innocent,” and insinuating that the men in black simply have the wrong creed to win an Oscar. Their arguments are so mind-numbingly off-base they could give you a concussion.

Let’s take a look at Tinseltown’s latest controversy:

1. Did the academy, admittedly an organization shrouded in secrecy, deliberately snub black actors two years in a row simply because of skin color?

Don’t know. Translation: Maybe they did, and maybe they didn’t. But that’s the whole point. Labeling one of the preeminent Hollywood institutions racist, and by extension calling its members bigots, are mighty powerful charges to be leveled without a shred of evidence beyond the “sight” test. As such, it should be incumbent upon those making such accusations to back up what they allege.

But they didn’t. No leaked internal documents showing racism, no secret recordings of backroom deals to keep the blacks out, no smoking gun. Just their opinions.

As a result, their message, especially to our youth, is that it’s OK to shoot your mouth off and demonize anyone you choose – lack of facts notwithstanding and people’s reputations be damned – just because you don’t like the way something pans out. (Of course, it’s a whole lot easier to do such things when you’re wealthy and powerful, a lesson surely lost on their followers who risk job and security when acting similarly.)

Using one’s platform to draw attention to a cause is admirable, but only when it doesn’t impugn the character and reputation of others without justification.

Smith and Lee’s actions are highly questionable, since they reinforce the do-and-say-whatever-makes-you-feel-good entitlement attitude sweeping America. Good role models, they are not.

2. If there is such strong institutional racism within the academy, how to explain the numerous black actors who have been nominated for past Oscars? That includes Will Smith – twice. And Spike Lee – twice, as well as being the recipient of an honorary Oscar just last year. The same Oscars, incidentally, that are being hosted by a black comedian (Chris Rock) and overseen by a black producer (Reginald Hudlin).

These pesky facts have, apparently, been forgotten by Smith and Lee. How convenient.

And how to explain, for the second consecutive year, a record number of black nominees and winners, especially black women, for the Emmy awards? It was a 64 percent gain from the previous year, which itself had been a record.

The Golden Globes have had no shortage of black nominees and winners, nor do any of the other awarding institutions, including the Black Reel Awards, the Black Film Awards, the American Black Film Festival, and Black Entertainment Television.

So let’s get this straight. Despite black actors being nominated by the academy for years, it’s acceptable to cry “racism” because your film, your husband, and other black actors didn’t happen to make the cut this time?

Too many actors in Hollywood become insulated from real life, leading many to forget where they came from, and how they got there. But this is too much, even for Tinseltown. With all the problems we face, from terrorism to hunger to real racism, we’re supposed to care about whining millionaires who didn’t win yet another award? Please.

3. So why did no black actors get nominated? Who knows? Maybe their performances simply weren’t that good, or that their films didn’t measure up. Maybe some were beaten out by better actors in better flicks in a year that simply didn’t go their way. Guess what? That’s called life, and it isn’t always right or fair, especially when human subjectivity is involved. But is complaining and using divisive language the answer? Do these narcissists really believe they have a right to be coddled, and that we should jump every time they feel slighted?

4. Some are claiming that the Oscar ratings were down 16 percent last year because of the alleged racism. They are wrong.

The reason people aren’t tuning is much simpler: Besides many bad movies, the Oscars have become long and boring, featuring self-aggrandizing actors reading incoherent speeches and thanking people we’ve never heard of. Throw in corny hosts telling painfully unfunny jokes, and it has all grown very old. There’s an invention called cable TV, and people are using it to turn the channel. To paraphrase “Field Of Dreams:” If they change the content, viewers will come. But they haven’t.

5. One of two things is true:

– If racism is involved, it would show those in Hollywood to be ultimate hypocrites. They talk the talk by using liberal pyschobabble buzzwords such as tolerance, inclusion and diversity, but when it comes time to walk the walk, they run the other way.

– Or racism played no part in the academy’s decisions, in which case they chose what they believed to be merit over skin color, knowing their actions, while correct, would nonetheless create controversy. A gutsy move – who’d have thought?

6. Where does the push for “diversity” end? Will we see quotas for minority actors next year? And will there be ones for ethnicity, gender and sexual preference, too? And what happens to those deserving of an award but who get shafted because they happen to be the wrong skin color, since overt reverse discrimination would be the new rule?

It is not without irony that the Oscar controversy was raging on the holiday celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Perhaps the boycotters would do well to recall his timeless words about what America should be, instead of hurling racial barbs around the town that gave them fame and fortune: “… a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Unfortunately, this fight looks to get uglier before it gets better, as the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences president is already caving in to the boycott. And that means for this story, there won’t be a happy-ever-after Hollywood ending.

Rich Black Hypocrisy In Tinsel Town.

Remember Martin Luther King Jr.

Remember Martin Luther King Jr.We were remiss this year in giving Martin Luther King Day the recognition it deserves. While we didn’t forget Monday entirely, our remembrance was in code.

So here is a belated tribute.

Rev. King probably would have been proud to be called an Uncle Tom.

Here is the text of his wonderful “I Have A Dream” speech given, Aug. 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial. Note the phrases praising God, The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we’ve come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we’ve come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the “unalienable Rights” of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.”

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we’ve come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.

We cannot turn back.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating: “For Whites Only.” We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until “justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”¹

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. And some of you have come from areas where your quest — quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” — one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; “and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.”2

This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with.

With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

And this will be the day — this will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning:

My country ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.

Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride,

From every mountainside, let freedom ring!

And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.

And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.

Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.

Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.

But not only that:

Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.

From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:

Free at last! Free at last!

Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!

Remember Martin Luther King Jr. 

Republicans Remove Confederate Flag

Republicans Remove Confederate Flag
The South Carolina State Capitol on Feb. 18, 2000.

The Delaware County Daily Times, today, July 11, included in the AP story regarding the removal of the Confederate flag from the South Carolina Capitol grounds the twistedly disingenuous and curious claim that the flag “had been defended by white Republican leaders until last month as a symbol of Southern pride.”

Of course, the article omitted any reference to the party that raised the flag nor did it bother to note the party to which Gov. Nikki Haley belonged.

So here is some history. The flag was raised in 1962 over the State Capitol in Columbia by Gov. Ernest Hollings, a liberal Democrat, to defend segregation and Jim Crow. Hollings would go on to become a U.S. senator and  would serve in the Senate until 2005. He was a friend and supporter of Bill and Hillary Clinton and the progressive big government agenda.

In 1996, conservative Republican Gov. David Beasley made a strong push to remove the flag. He failed to win re-election in 1998 because of it. The die-hard sons of the Confederacy pointedly stayed home while the progressives and their tools in the Black establishment supported his opponent, Jim Hodges, who said he would keep the flag where it was.

Hodges, after much national pressure, agreed to remove the flag from the Capitol dome in 2000 to a monument on the State House grounds.

And there it flew until yesterday when it was removed for good  in response to the June 17 Charlestown shootings. The removal was demanded by Gov. Haley, a Republican, and without outside pressure. It was overwhelmingly approved by the overwhelmingly Republican legislature.

The hate from and the lies told by the old media about those whose politics differ from the reporters, photographers, editors and newsreaders are poisoning this country.

Republicans Remove Confederate Flag

Charity For All Monument

Charity For All Monument We always considered the Confederate flag a symbol to allow the losers of a war to maintain some dignity so bumper stickers and belt buckles containing it don't cause us to judge the one sporting them as a racist.  Of course, the one flown on the grounds of the South Carolina capitol is a different matter as it was raised by a friend of Hillary Clinton to defend Jim Crow and it should be taken down.  If they really want that flag to fly in Columbia, S.C. maybe the thing to do is to build a monument inscribed with the words of Lincoln's Second Inaugural just as at the memorial in Washington D.C., with  a bust of Lincoln on the top with the American and Confederate flags on the sides. You can call it the "With Charity For All" Monument.We always considered the Confederate flag a symbol to allow the losers of a war to maintain some dignity so bumper stickers and belt buckles containing it don’t cause us to judge the one sporting them as a racist.

Of course, the one flown on the grounds of the South Carolina capitol is a different matter as it was raised by a friend of Hillary Clinton to defend Jim Crow and it should be taken down.

If they really want that flag to fly in Columbia, S.C. maybe the thing to do is to build a monument inscribed with the words of Lincoln’s Second Inaugural just as at the memorial in Washington D.C., with  a bust of Lincoln on the top with the American and Confederate flags on the sides. You can call it the “With Charity For All” Monument.

And that should solve the problem and finally end the Civil War.

Charity For All Monument

Evil Demeaned By Political Correctness

Dylann Roof -- Evil Demeaned By Political Correctness
Dylann Roof, suspected mass murderer

A 21-year-old twisted soul named Dylann Roof last night, June 17, reportedly murdered nine persons during a prayer service at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C.

Roof is white and the people he killed were black.

“We believe this is a hate crime; that is how we are investigating it,” said Charleston Police Chief Greg Mullen, in what might have been the dumbest  quote ever made by a law enforcement official.

Mullen’s politically correct statement demeans evil. It wasn’t name calling that Roof is alleged to have done but cold blooded mass murder of kind people.

In Mullen’s defense, he probably had other things on his mind when he said it but what happened last night is no different that what ISIS does routinely in the Mideast. You want to call what they do “hate crime”? The phrasing of Pope Francis is far better.  What happened at the Emanuel AME Church was not a “hate crime” but Satanic barbarism.

Racism appears to be Roof’s motive but don’t consider the victims black or Roof white. The victims are persons as is Roof. Roof is one who has (allegedly) chosen evil.

Skin color is meaningless. The only people to whom it matters are those who want to manipulate others for their own gain.

Forgive the fudging i.e “allegedly” regarding Roof but we remember initially misidentifying the shooter from Sandy Hook.

Evil Demeaned By Political Correctness