PHL Can Tell TSA To Go To . . .

An exercise for Zen practitioners:  A
man wearing nothing but a raincoat  approaches a TSA screener. He
opens the raincoat and says “check out my junk”. Has a flashing
occurred?

Philadelphia International Airport was among the airports receiving Congressman John Mica’s letter letting them know they can divorce the Transportation Security Administration,  at least with regard to passenger screenings, if they should find that the TSA’s new “hands-on” approach is a bit counter-productive to security.

The letter notes that the Aviation and Transportation Security Act of 2001 that created the TSA allowed airports to revert to private contractors for screenings after two years.

Mica ( R-FL7) was one of the authors of the bill.

The actual wording of the bill’s Section 44920 (a) is:

(a)
IN GENERAL- On or after the last day of the 2-year period beginning on
the date on which the Under Secretary transmits to Congress the
certification required by section 110(c) of the Aviation and
Transportation Security Act, an operator of an airport may submit to the
Under Secretary an application to have the screening of passengers and
property at the airport under section 44901 to be carried out by the
screening personnel of a qualified private screening company under a
contract entered into with the Under Secretary.


A staffer for Mica said the letter went out to the 100 busiest airports in the nation. PHL is the 11th busiest in the world.

Orlando International Airport has announced that it will consider the change.  We await word on what plans PHL may have.

For some strange reason the George Soros-affiliated site MediaMatters.org is opposing the privatization.

1 thought on “PHL Can Tell TSA To Go To . . .”


  1. “An exercise for Zen practitioners: A man wearing nothing but a raincoat approaches a TSA screener. He opens the raincoat and says “check out my junk”. Has a flashing occurred?

    Philadelphia International Airport was among the airports receiving Congressman John Mica’s letter letting them know they can divorce the Transportation Security Administration, at least with regard to passenger screenings, if they should find that the TSA’s new “hands-on” approach is a bit counter-productive to security.”

    My question is this: Does thye TSA do a background check on the people they hire to ogle and group nuns, children, etal?
    Now, about the legality of the flashers. If found that it is all right to be garbed only in a raincoat. Will this create long lines for flights destined for San Francisco?

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