Merry Christmas 2020

Merry Christmas Charlie Brown 2020

Here’s what Christmas is all about:

And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night.

9 And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.

10 And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.

11 For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.

12 And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.

13 And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,

14 Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.

Merry Christmas Charlie Brown

Merry Christmas Charlie Brown 2020

Quinhagak, Alaska Merry Christmas

This was uploaded to YouTube on Dec 20, 2010 and has become a bit of Christmas tradtion. It’s the then Kuinerrarmiut Elitnaurviat 5th Grade class in Quinhagak, Alaska illustrating the Hallelujah Chorus from George Frideric Handel’s oratorio Messiah
Those kids are now out of high school.

Quinhagak, Alaska Merry Christmas

Quinhagak, Alaska Merry Christmas

Black Friday Name Origin Joseph P. Barrett

Black Friday Name Origin Joseph P. Barrett originally was published Nov. 25, 2015. The men responsible for naming the day, Joe Barrett and Nate Kleger were co-workers and friends of William Lawrence Sr. who provides us with our Omnibits and Cryptowits.

Black Friday Name Origin Joseph P. Barrett
Joseph P. Barrett, the man who gave us “Black Friday”.

Black Friday, in reference to the day after Thanksgiving, was first used in a 1951 article  in the trade publication Factory Management and Maintenance” and concerned the habit of employees calling in sick the day after the holiday to get a four-day weekend.

The article by M. J. Murphy  recommended just making the day a paid holiday.

However, the term’s use as a day of shopping chaos has a Philadelphia root, the popularization of which can be squarely placed on the shoulders of Joseph P. Barrett and Nathan Kleger, who were police reporters with the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin.

Philadelphia traffic squad cops had been using the phrase to describe the massive Center City traffic jams that occurred the day after Thanksgiving. Kleger and Barrett wrote a front-page piece circa 1960 in which they appropriated the phrase. The paper in ensuing years continued with the phrase and local TV soon joined.

And then the nation.

Black Friday Name Origin Joseph P. Barrett