Residencies Not Guaranteed For Med School Grads And Not Getting One Can End Career

Residencies Not Guaranteed For Med School Grads And Not Getting One Can End Career

By Maria Fotopoulos

For basketball fans and players, the third month of the year means “March Madness,” one of the biggest sporting events. March for some college undergraduates means spring break in exotic locales. For thousands of this year’s medical school graduates, March means the exciting culmination of eight years of higher education – undergraduate training and medical school – and the next step in the medical profession: residency training. But for thousands of other doctors, it means rejection, doubt and questioning the way forward.

Residency training is the additional hands-on learning that occurs at a teaching hospital or clinic after a doctor has graduated from medical school. Residencies are funded by taxpayers at a cost of about $150,000 per year. Of that, the average medical resident earns $64,000 a year. The length of training can last from two to five or more years, depending on the specialty area. Residencies are grueling and punishing, with exceedingly long hours. To apply for a residency, doctors must have passed USMLE (United States Medical Licensing Examination) Steps 1 and 2, also known as the board exams.

The National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) is the nonprofit organization that has been “matching” doctors to residency programs since 1952. Public perception for a long time has been that once a doctor graduates from medical school, that’s it. A doctor is a doctor and can go forth and practice medicine. And that was pretty much true for several decades. But then began a divergence. There were more doctors – including ones from other countries – applying for residencies than there were residencies. A major factor was the 1997 Balanced Budget Act (BBA), which capped the number of residents and fellows that the federal Medicare program would support. And Medicare was the single largest source of funding for graduate medical education (GME). Not until the end of 2020 was there an increase in residency positions when H.R.133 – Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, was signed into law. The legislation included funding for 1,000 (200 slots per year over five years) new Medicare-supported GME positions.

In this year’s Match, NRMP put the positive spin on the numbers, reporting, “The 2022 Match realized many significant milestones including a record number of U.S. MD and U.S. DO [doctor of osteopathic medicine] senior applicants and the largest number of total and first-year positions offered.” But the reality is that more than 7,000 doctors who are U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents still don’t have residencies. Thus, we continue to fail our doctors who have invested years and hundreds of thousands of dollars for their training and who are eager to contribute to America’s healthcare system and alleviate the much-discussed looming U.S. shortage of between 38,000 and 124,000 physicians in both primary and specialty care by 2034.

Last month, Kevin Lynn, cofounder of Doctors without Jobs, testified before the House Committee on the Judiciary on the topic, “Is There a Doctor in the House? The Role of Immigrant Physicians in the U.S. Healthcare System.” Lynn emphasized that not only are we sidelining our talent, but we’re also subsidizing doctors from other countries by importing them to fill U.S. taxpayer-funded residencies. The number is significant: more than 40,000 foreign doctors have been given taxpayer-funded residencies in the last 10 years.

This issue impacts every American who accesses the healthcare system. Unmatched doctors and American citizens alike should call and write their elected officials – weekly, until this is fixed – and ask that they prioritize our doctors for residency positions. Current legislation, H.R. 2256, The Resident Physician Shortage Reduction Act of 2021, would create more residency slots, but in its current iteration, it does not prioritize U.S. physicians for these spots. H.R. 2256 needs to be modified to hire American doctors first.U.S. politicians have had no problem in recent weeks quickly finding $14 billion, which includes weapons, not just humanitarian aid, for the Ukraine. But for more than a dozen years, these elected officials haven’t been able to find the dollars to take care of American doctors. Maybe there’s no money to be made for American elites and the political class by fixing this problem.Maria Fotopoulos works with Doctors without Jobs on communications issues. Contact her at mariaf@turbodogcommunications.com.
Residencies Not Guaranteed For Med School Grads And Not Getting One Can End Career Residencies Not Guaranteed
Residencies Not Guaranteed For Med School Grads And Not Getting One Can End Career

Hospitals Endangered In Delco, Chesco

Hospitals Endangered In Delco, Chesco

By Bob Small

West Grove’s Jennersville Hospital closed on Dec. 31 and Caln’s Brandywine Hospital closed on Jan. 31.  These institutions in Chester County are owned by Tower Health and lost $42 million in the last fiscal year. 

In my Delaware County, Crozer Health Systems which operates Crozer- Chester, Delaware County Memorial, Springfield, and Taylor hospitals, along with outpatient centers and physician practices is being sold to ChristianaCare Health System. 

While Delaware County Memorial has closed its maternity ward, and Taylor has ended its hospice program, the hospitals are remaining open for the time being, according to Kevin M. Spiegel, chief executive officer of Crozer Health.

Hospitals Endangered In Delco, Chesco

We should note that Crozer Chester is the hospital for Chester, Pa., one of the poorest cities in the nation.  All four of these hospitals serve, or served, a population with limited medical coverage mobility, who were unable to use their coverage in other hospitals.

In the mean times, and these will be mean times, some of us have coverage that let us use hospitals in say, Delaware or Philadelphia.  Most in Chesco and Delco do not. Many of these residents will be scrambling to find a hospital to use.  Some may fail. For some, these are just regular routine tests, but for others…..

Since we started this article, Chester County Common Pleas Court Judge Edward Griffith has given hope to saving Brandywine and Jennersville hospitals by ordering Tower Health to resume negotiatons with Canyon Atlantic Partners. A sale fell through in December.

At a Feb. 15 town hall, State Senator Tim Kearney (D-26) responded, D-26, responded to my query about asset striping, citing the Hahnemann Hospital case, by saying that the State Legislature had various pending bills to address this.  He favored hospitals being run by non-profits such as ChristianaCare rather than for-profit entities like Crozer Health.

Hospitals Endangered In Delco, Chesco

Labor Force Deaths Rise 40 Percent According To Insurer

Labor Force Deaths Rise 40 Percent According To Insurer — OneAmerica, an Indiana-based insurance company, says that deaths are up 40 percent for those of working age, which is 18 to 64, from pre-Covid levels.

Most of the claims for deaths being filed are not classified as COVID-19 deaths.

America’s health care system is run by sociopaths, morons and cowards.

Hat tip Steve Kirsch.

Labor Force Deaths Rise 40 Percent According To Insurer

Ivermectin Being Withheld In Wilmington From ICU Patient

Ivermectin Being Withheld In Wilmington From ICU PatientThis was just sent to us with a request to pass it on. There is absolutely no reason to withhold ivermectin from someone suffering from Covid-19. And why wouldn’t “right-to-try” apply, especially if the patient has a prescription?

Ivermectin Being Withheld In Wilmington From ICU Patient
Wilmington Hospital won’t let David Demarco take one of these pills for just five days we are told.

My husband David DeMarco is a passionate 54-year-old man who was healthy and strong before contracting COVID. He is an accomplished video editor and has won four Emmy awards for his broadcast television work as well as awards for a feature-length documentary. He loves life and people! But today he is fighting for his life in the ICU at Wilmington Hospital (Delaware).

The care team has been compassionate and is doing everything in their power to help David and we sincerely thank them for their hard work and sacrifice in this terrible fight. But we are asking for one simple thing that they will not provide, and that is the ability to give him a medication that we believe will save his life: Ivermectin.

I am holding in my hand a legitimate prescription from a compounding pharmacy for Ivermectin/Vitamin D321 mg/5000U, in David’s name, and I just want to be able to give it to him. We have a right to try this medication since David is in dire need and suffering from a life-threatening disease!

MaryEllen DeMarco

Ivermectin Being Withheld In Wilmington From ICU Patient

YouTube Challenge Ivermectin HCQ

YouTube Challenge Ivermectin HCQ — YouTube’s policy warns not to post content that claims that Ivermectin or Hydroxychloroquine are effective treatments for COVID-19.

We did a little test. Technicality, we didn’t violate the policy as, well, we praised it. Hope they don’t think we are being sarcastic.

Here it is, unless they pull it:

Here are the links to the information cited:

Times of India https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/treating-covid-at-home-here-are-health-ministrys-guidelines/articleshow/82313480.cms

Pathophysiological Basis and Rationale for Early Outpatient Treatment of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Infection https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(20)30673-2/fulltext#seccesectitle0006REPLY

Yahoo News story on study at Saint Barnabas Medical Center https://news.yahoo.com/study-shows-hydroxychloroquine-zinc-treatments-210300816.htmlREPLY

Observational Study on 255 Mechanically Ventilated Covid Patients at the Beginning of the USA Pandemic (Saint Barnabas Medical Center) https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.05.28.21258012v1REPLY

As YouTube has banned the video here it is here:

https://t.me/BillLawrence/537

YouTube Challenge Ivermectin HCQ

YouTube Challenge Ivermectin HCQ

Transgender Bandwagon Ruining Girls Lives

Transgender Bandwagon Ruining Girls Lives — Bob S sent us this link to an article by Debbie Hayton about how the transgender bandwagon is causing permanent ruin to young girls. It’s worth reading.

We’d like to also note that the transgender bandwagon is a big moneymaker.

Sick and evil people have taken control of large swaths of American institutions.

Transgender Bandwagon Ruining Girls Lives
Transgender Bandwagon Ruining Girls Lives

Blacks Covid Vitamin D And Things Not Told

Blacks Covid Vitamin D And Things Not Told— Way back when Tony Fauci was still appearing at White House press conferences he was asked why African Americans were disproportionately dying of Covid-19.

His answer, simplified, was that they were too fat.

Blacks Covid Vitamin D And Things Not Told

Those with dark skin are disproportionately dying of Covid — three times as much in May. The explanations offered by the “smart set” were greater co-morbidities as per Fauci or that Blacks were less likely to quarantine because they were performing “essential” labor like stocking warehouses or transporting neat gizmos to teachers enjoying extended vacations.

We have not seen one certified Beltway expert bring up that vitamin D appears to prevent bad results from Covid and that those with dark skin are more likely to suffer vitamin D insufficiency.

You would think that if they cared, they would throw it out as a possibility. It doesn’t have to be called a certainty. Vitamin D is a supplement sold over the counter. It’s not regulated by the FDA but Fauci’s task force could have provided guidance as to how much not to take. At least you would think so.

Healthline.com says “no studies have investigated the effect of vitamin D supplements or vitamin D deficiency on the risk of contracting the new coronavirus that causes COVID-19.”

Fair enough, but again you would think that the task force would be prioritizing such a study.

And it certainly seems far more harmful than not to tell those with dark skin that vitamin D appears to lessen Covid’s effects (fact); they are more likely to suffer from vitamin D insufficiency (fact); and that it might be wise for those with dark skin to supplement their diets with vitamin D within appropriate guidelines.

In June –two months after Fauci blamed co-morbidity for the higher death rate among blacks — he testified before Congress that it was really racism.

Look in the mirror, Doc.

Blacks Covid Vitamin D And Things Not Told

Unemployment Victims Include Doctors

Unemployment Victims Include Doctors

By Kevin Lynn 


July unemployment came in at 10.2 percent, still above the 10 percent high in the 2007-2009 recession. Now more than ever, post-pandemic and social unrest, every effort should be made to create and keep jobs for Americans across all professions to ensure that our country rights itself. That includes those professions that are, mistakenly, perceived to be recession-proof.

Media coverage in recent few months has bemoaned that some doctors on visas might have to leave the U.S., or not be allowed to enter the country with pandemic travel restrictions. But there’s been scant attention paid to the thousands of recent American graduates of medical schools who remain unlicensed, and thus unable to practice medicine. Why? One factor is that U.S. taxpayer-funded medical residencies have gone to doctors from other countries – more than 4,200 just this year – those that media is so concerned about.

Unemployment Victims Include Doctors


At the same time – as doctors and nurses work 12-hour shifts, nearly dropping from exhaustion and with no pandemic end in sight – there is another long-ignored conversation. That is the prolonged U.S. doctor “shortage.” That we would have a doctor shortage when we have thousands of newly minted doctors not working is certainly confusing. An obvious solution to what’s being consistently reported as too few doctors is to put our own talented, dedicated doctors to work and to eagerly recruit and encourage others to enter medicine, rather than pilfer, hijack and steal the physicians from other nations.

We as a nation hold the embarrassing 52nd spot in the world in our doctor-to-patient ratio, far behind dozens of other nations, including some developing countries. Armenia, Azerbaijan and Andorra outrank America.  Cuba, with 8.19 doctors per 1,000 patients, has the highest doctor/patient ratio and contrasts to our 2.59 doctors per 1,000 patients.

We cannot continue to invest taxpayer and other dollars in training doctors only to then push them aside, effectively saying, “Although you thought you had reasonable, fair and equitable expectations when you graduated from medical school, you were wrong. Fooled you! We increasingly prefer foreign nationals to the greatest extent possible.” It’s completely unsustainable, as has been our approach in other areas, including technology.

In the last decade, more than 36,000 non-U.S. citizen students and graduates of international medical schools have been granted U.S. residencies (remember, they’re taxpayer-funded), and in each of the last ten years, the number has gone up, from 2,721 to 4,222 this year. All this is happening as our U.S. citizen doctors may be left driving Uber, with eight years of education that doesn’t easily transfer to another profession, and perhaps as much as half a million dollars in student loan debt.

By every ethical and moral standard, we are violating our social contract with our own citizens. It is nothing less than immoral and unethical to have medical students – students accepted into highly competitive schools – rise to meet brutal academic requirements and, in most cases, take on a huge debt load for their educations, all in the hopes of serving others, only to be shut out of the whole system. “Sorry! We’ve decided to hire the doctors from other countries instead.”

This is a most brutal and unacknowledged form of discrimination. 

The powerful American Medical Association, which has lobbied for more H-1B and J-1 visas to bring in foreign doctors, has a lot of explaining to do, as does the Association of American Medical Colleges. Ditto our elected officials in the House and Senate. 

Our doctors are waiting to go to work.

The Executive Director of PFIR, Kevin Lynn also is the founder of Doctors without Jobs and U.S. Tech Workers. Contact him at klynn@pfirdc.org

Unemployment Victims Include Doctors

Residency Policy Punishes Good US Doctors — And The Rest Of Us

Residency Policy Punishes Good US Doctors — And The Rest Of Us

By Dr. Doug Medina

For years, the Association of American Medical Colleges has predicted the United States will face a large physician shortage, and the coronavirus pandemic may further exacerbate this shortage.

However, there are thousands of qualified U.S. doctors who are unable to practice. Every year, about 1,000 U.S. citizens graduate medical schools in the U.S., but don’t move onto residency at a teaching hospital because they don’t “match” via the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP), the organization that controls this process. Without matching into residency, doctors cannot practice medicine.

Residency Policy Punishes Good US Doctors -- And The Rest Of Us

I’m one of those doctors ready to help during this current pandemic but can’t. Even though I graduated Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM) in good standing, earning Honors in five clinical rotations, I have not matched into residency.

My path to a top-tier medical school in our nation’s capital started at the University of Colorado where I earned a degree in biochemistry. After college, I received a grant to work at the Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Materials Research Center in Colorado. My hard work and study ethic helped me score in the 90th percentile on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). I was accepted to GUSOM, which receives about 10,000 applications per year and only selects about 200 candidates.

Since graduating Georgetown in 2011, I passed the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE), Steps 1, 2 and 3. To become a licensed physician, a doctor must pass the USMLE. While I am a nationally licensed physician in the U.S., I cannot practice because I do not have a license number since I don’t have a residency position.

This is happening every year to too many U.S. doctors.

Since 2011, I worked with Floating Doctors, an international nonprofit organization in Central America. In 2014, I published research from the Research Institute on Addictions. After 2014, I received grants to work as an extern under supervising psychiatrists at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, the first federally operated mental health hospital, and the Veteran’s Administration Mental Health Clinic in Washington, D.C. I’ve worked jobs in electronic medical records and as an intake clinician admitting patients at a mental health hospital. I’ve had nine supervisors give me high marks and provide letters of recommendation.

To obtain my medical degree, I incurred debt of $50,000+ per year in federal student loans to pay tuition at Georgetown. With an interest rate of 6.7 percent, my student loans accrue interest of more than $25,000 annually and have ballooned to more than $460,000. Even with my job as an intake clinician earning $30 an hour, and paying my student loans via an Income Driven Repayment (IDR) plan, I’m not even able to afford to pay the accruing monthly interest on my student loans.

Last month, more than 1,200 U.S. medical seniors did not match into residency through the NRMP. In addition, an untold number of prior medical graduates didn’t match. In fact, each year, upwards of 2,000 current-year grads and prior-year graduates don’t match.

Yet just this year, through the NRMP, 4,222 non-U.S. citizen international medical graduates (non-U.S. IMGs) from medical schools outside the U.S. were provided medical residencies, which are largely funded by U.S. taxpayers (via Medicare funding). In fact, each year since 2011, the year I graduated, the number of non-U.S. IMGs receiving U.S. residencies has increased – from 2,721 in 2011 to more than 4,200 in 2020, a total of more than 36,000 foreign doctors in a ten-year period.

To ensure fairness to American citizens, a simple solution is to prioritize U.S. graduates. This may mean a lower number of foreign doctors receiving residency positions, but in this current pandemic, doctors are needed in their home countries. For instance, currently, India has a shortage of 600,000 doctors.

Institutions that should do more to help American doctors achieve their goals work against them. That includes the powerful, influential American Medical Association, which has been lobbying to issue more employment-based visas like the H-1B and the J-1.

U.S. medical students go through a highly rigorous process to get one of the coveted first-year slots. We have a reasonable expectation that when we graduate medical school, we’ll practice our chosen profession. To be shut out while foreign nationals are hired violates America’s social contract with its citizens.

There are reasonable solutions to address this serious problem that is ruining thousands of American lives per year. The governing medical organizations, universities and our elected officials must right this wrong.

Dr. Doug Medina is a graduate of Georgetown University School of Medicine and advocate for ensuring U.S. doctors in good standing receive residency status in order to practice medicine. Contact Medina at info@doctorswithoutjobs.org.

Residency Policy Punishes Good US Doctors — And The Rest Of Us

Black Plague Looms For Los Angeles

Black Plague Looms For Los Angeles — Dr. Drew Pinsky on last night’s (May 30) Ingraham Angle reported that Los Angeles is experiencing medieval diseases such as typhus, typhoid fever, and, notably, the bubonic plague, which killed half of Europe in the 14th century.

Black Plague Looms

“We have a complete breakdown of the basic needs of civilization in Los Angeles,” Pinsky said.

He said airborne disease like tuberculous is exploding.

He said that rat-borne disease is unchecked as L.A. is one of the country’s few major cities that doesn’t have a rodent control program.

There will be a typhus outbreak this summer, he said, and worse.

“I’m hearing from experts that bubonic plague is likely. It’s already here,” he said.

And of course, there is the disease spread by fecal filth in the street like typhoid fever.

“This is not Third World,” he said. “This is medieval. Third World countries would be insulted if they were accused of being like this,

Welcome to the Golden State. Guess that’s what happens in “sanctuary states” that consider unrestricted abortion to be the primary health objective.

Pinsky noted that L.A. is sub-optimally immunized.

“God forbid if measles gets in,” he said.

Questions for all the progressives sneering at the anti-vaxxers: Do unvaccinated illegal immigrants — who exponentially outnumber anti-vaxxers — cause any concern for you?

For laughs, the Los Angeles Times is blaming “climate change” for the looming plague outbreak. Do people really still believe the garbage the establishment media is feeding them?

Black Plague Looms For Los Angeles
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