Larry Krasner Impeachment Looms

Larry Krasner Impeachment Looms — The Pennsylvania Legislature appears to be about to impeach Larry Krasner — the guy George Soros hand-picked as Philadelphia District Attorney —as just revealed on WPHT’s Dom Giordano Show.

Murders during Krasner’s reign have risen from 317 in 2017 to 562 last year, a record.

Larry Krasner Impeachment Looms
A face only a Soros can love.

They are on a pace to hit 660 for 2022 according to Dom.

The Republicans control both chambers. The House, which has a 112-89 R edge, can impeach Krasner with a simple majority. Two-thirds of the Senate, though, is required for removal. The Republican advantage, there, is 28-20 with one independent who caucuses R, and one vacancy.

Will the R’s hold together? The guy behind the push is Senate Pro Tempore Jake Corman of the 34th District, so that seems likely.

Will four Democrats join them? Don’t rule it out. There are still Democrats who represent conservative areas that don’t hate police.

Regardless, I think Corman just got our vote for Governor.

Sorry Donna 🙂

Larry Krasner Impeachment Looms

Throwing Money At Migration Means More Failure

Throwing Money At Migration Means More Failure

By Joe Guzzardi

Vice President Kamala Harris, doubtlessly growing exasperated by the criticism she’s received for neglecting her Southwest border duties, called on Wall Street chief executive officers to help her sort out immigration problems. The summoned executives came from prominent commercial banks like J P Morgan Chase and Citigroup, as well as industry titans from Microsoft, Chobani, PepsiCo Latin America, Cargill and Airbnb.

In early January, Harris announced more than $1.2 billion in new funding to address, as she so often calls it, the “root causes” of migration to the United States. The concept is to foster more economic opportunity in the Northern Triangle countries of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador to deter illegal immigration. Harris made the announcement during a roundtable with the CEOs. Offering a preview of Harris’ announcement to reporters, a Senior White House representative praised “her leadership, her vision.”

A more complete analysis of the promised funding is that it represents a major commitment by the big businesses, but no money has been invested yet, no jobs have been created, and no one even knows if the subsidy, assuming it ever gets off the ground, will have the promised effect – deterring illegal immigration. A look back at history suggests that Harris’ throw-money-at-the-problem plan is doomed to fail, and colossally.

Not that long ago, in 2015 to be exact, and under exactly the identical circumstances of border surging that included large numbers of unaccompanied minors, the Obama administration proposed a huge investment in the Northern Triangle countries. Then-Vice-President Joe Biden wrote a New York Times op-ed titled “A Plan for Central America” which envisioned “systematic change” that would stabilize neighborhoods to reduce crime, encourage investments and create more effective tax collections among local governments. Biden promised that the Obama administration’s financial support would end “endemic violence and poverty.”

In his op-ed, Biden also compared the Obama administration’s proposed team up with the Alliance for Prosperity to the 1999 Plan Colombia, a failed six-year, $9 billion anti-drug experiment. By 2006, the State Department, then under President George Bush’s direction, shifted its funding to Mexico, and the Merida Initiative with part of its funding designated for Central America. The initiative promised to curtail “the illicit flow of drugs, people, arms, and cash,” a vow that has been broken virtually since the moment the ink dried on the pact.

Throwing Money At Migration Means More Failure

In 2010, the Central America program was separated from the Merida Initiative, and repackaged as CARI. From 2008 to 2013, the Merida Initiative and CARI received more than $2 billion and $574 million in federal funding, respectively. But CARI did nothing to stem violence or to reduce the migrant surge into the U.S. If anything, the opposite happened. In Honduras and Guatemala, homicide rates climbed steadily as U.S. funding for militarization via CARI began to flow. Honduras sent the largest number of kids to the U.S. border, followed by Guatemala. In 2012, two full years into CARI, there were 7,172 recorded homicides in Honduras, marking the most violent year in the country’s recent history. Murders in Honduras have since declined, but are still an unacceptably high at 3,496 in 2020.

Over the years, the U.S. has poured billions of dollars into the Northern Triangle countries with little to show for the money invested. Thousands of poetic words have been spoken and written like Biden’s and Harris’ about U.S. commitment to help the Northern Triangle nations help themselves. But Harris, the so-called border czar knows, as well as anyone, that with the borders wide open and beckoning, no amount of money or posturing, flowery editorials or public relations-written canned speeches will stop traffickers from bringing drugs and humans north. The National Center for Health Statistics reported that drug overdose deaths in the U.S. during 2020 soared 31 percent to 91,977. Sex trafficking for profit is big business, but prosecutions for those crimes are rare. Through its willful neglect, the Biden and Harris administration encourages trafficking despite its tragic and preventable cost in American lives.

As of early January 2022, the White House has given no indication that it will stop the huge inflow – a record high 1.7 million-plus during 2021 – of mainly poor, unskilled and under-educated migrants. Few fault migrants for wanting to improve their lives. But the unasked and therefore unanswered question is what will happen to education, health care, housing and myriad social challenges if, as appears probable, those waves of migrants continue coming. The latest Census Bureau data indicates that the U.S. has 37 million people that it classifies as living in poverty, and millions of Americans unemployed or underemployed. Struggling Americans are nowhere on the Biden administration’s radar.

Joe Guzzardi is a Progressives for Immigration Reform analyst who has written about immigration for more than 30 years. Contact him at jguzzardi@pfirdc.org.

Throwing Money At Migration Means More Failure

Everything Hitler Did Was Legal William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-18-22

Everything Hitler Did Was Legal William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-18-22

Ftq kagzs mdq bqdymzqzfxk uz m efmfq dqeqynxuzs uzfajuomfuaz.
Mduefafxq

Everything Hitler Did Was Legal William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-18-22Answer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: Never forget that everything Hitler did in Germany was legal.
Martin Luther King, Jr.

Everything Hitler Did Was Legal William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-18-22

Unplowed field of the wicked William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-17-22

Unplowed field of the wicked William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-17-22

Ypgpc qzcrpe esle pgpcjestyr Stewpc oto ty Rpcxlyj hld wprlw.
Xlcety Wfespc Vtyr, Uc.

Unplowed field of the wicked William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-17-22Answer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: Haughty eyes and a proud heart — the unplowed field of the wicked produce sin.
Proverbs 21:4

Unplowed field of the wicked William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-17-22

Best part of beauty William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-16-22

Best part of beauty William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-16-22

Qjdpqch nhnb jwm j yaxdm qnjac — cqn dwyuxfnm ornum xo cqn frltnm yaxmdln brw.
Yaxenakb

Best part of beauty William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-16-22Answer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: The best part of beauty is that which no picture can express.
Francis Bacon 

Best part of beauty William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-16-22

Constant conspiracy against the brave William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-15-22

Constant conspiracy against the brave William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-15-22

Bpm jmab xizb wn jmicbg qa bpib epqkp vw xqkbczm kiv mfxzmaa.
Nzivkqa Jikwv

Constant conspiracy against the brave William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-15-22Answer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: The world is in a constant conspiracy against the brave. It’s the age-old struggle: the roar of the crowd on the one side, and the voice of your conscience on the other.
Douglas MacArthur

Constant conspiracy against the brave William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-15-22

Arkhaven Comics Winning The Cultural War

Arkhaven Comics Winning The Cultural War — Comics stopped being our thing when we turned thirteen but we can’t deny their social influence especially as most of the world-wide blockbuster movies are based on them.

This is especially scary as sexually twisted people without moral foundation appear to have taken charge of the traditional comic book publishers.

As noted their social influence can’t be denied.

But there is hope. Vox Day is publishing new titles with heroic, uplifting and entertaining storylines at Arkhaven.com

The stable of artists include Chuck Dixon and Ben Garrison.

The works are free for now and we’ve found ourselves spending several hours perusing them.

Oh to be a kid again.

Heroism, uplift and entertainment will always win in the end over freak shows.

Check them out here.

Arkhaven Comics Winning The Cultural War

Arkhaven Comics Winning The Cultural War

Good Catholic meddles in politics –William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-14-22

Good Catholic meddles in politics –William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-14-22

Aol dvysk pz pu h jvuzahua jvuzwpyhjf hnhpuza aol iyhcl. Pa’z aol hnl-vsk zaybnnsl: aol yvhy vm aol jyvdk vu aol vul zpkl, huk aol cvpjl vm fvby jvuzjplujl vu aol vaoly.
Kvbnshz ThjHyaoby

Good Catholic meddlesAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: A good Catholic meddles in politics, offering the best of himself, so that those who govern can govern. But what is the best that we can offer to those who govern? Prayer!
Pope Francis

Good Catholic meddles in politics –William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-14-22

Laws too gentle William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-13-22

Laws too gentle William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-13-22

G muuj Igznuroi skjjrky ot vurozoiy, ullkxotm znk hkyz ul nosykrl, yu zngz znuyk cnu mubkxt igt mubkxt. Haz cngz oy znk hkyz zngz ck igt ullkx zu znuyk cnu mubkxt? Vxgekx!
Vuvk Lxgtioy

Laws too gentle William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-13-22Answer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: Laws too gentle are seldom obeyed; too severe, seldom executed.
Benjamin Franklin

Laws too gentle William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 1-13-22

MLB Lockout Is Billionaires Versus Multimillionaires

MLB Lockout Is Billionaires Versus Multimillionaires

By Joe Guzzardi

Major League Baseball’s player lockout had no sooner begun than commissioner Rob Manfred sent a letter to fans attempting to assuage ire about the possibility of another partial season – the sixth in 50 years – or even no season at all.

Fans can read through Manfred’s letter, but cutting through its tedious gobbledygook, the bottom line is that the billionaire owners, who preside over a multibillion-dollar industry, want to keep as much of their fortune as possible. The players, many of them already multi-millionaires, want to earn oodles more even sooner. MLB has at least ten billionaire owners; four of them have a net worth that exceeds $2 billion. The New York Yankees are the wealthiest team; it’s valued at $5.25 billion.

From a list of the 20 richest players that includes the active, the retired and the disgraced, their net worth ranges from a low of $80 million – CC Sabathia – to the highest – Alex Rodriguez – $350 million. In 2021, the average player’s salary was $4.2 million, nearly a two-fold increase since 2003, while the 2019 median household income was $69,000. The minimum MLB salary for an eight-month work schedule is $570,000. Fans have no rooting interest in the confrontation between owners and players; a pox on both their houses is a commonly heard rebuttal to clashes between the billionaires and the millionaires.

MLB Lockout Is Billionaires Versus Multimillionaires

Baseball is in trouble, not a news flash, but an indisputable fact that should grow more worrisome to the commissioner, the owners and the players. On the field, a single game illustrates baseball’s woes: the World Series, 1960, game seven, Pittsburgh Pirates against the New York Yankees: a day game, played on grass, that the Pirates won, 10-9. Even though the teams scored 19 runs, and combined for 26 hits, the game wrapped up in a tidy 2:36.

Today’s fans, especially the younger ones that baseball desperately needs as it plods forward, find the games too long and too boring. The average length of nine-inning games in 2021 was a record 3:10, compared to about 2 hours and 30 minutes in the 1970s. Games in the 2021 postseason were even longer. The average length of a nine-inning game was 3 hours and 37 minutes with nine of the 36 games grinding endlessly on four hours or longer.

The major culprit is the number of pitchers used in a game. The 2020 rule which requires that, barring injury, a pitcher must face a minimum of three batters or complete an inning before he can be removed is ineffective. In the 2021 regular season teams used a record 3.4 relief pitchers per game. In the postseason, nearly half the starting pitchers were yanked before the sixth inning which boosted the average number of relievers summoned in a nine-inning game to 4.3. No surprise then that last 30 World Series games have all ended past 11 p.m. EDT. Back in 1960, the Pirates finished off the Yankees at 3:36 p.m.

Today, MLB has more in common with Apple than it does with what was once reverently referred to as the national pastime. Immediately endangered is Spring Training which, in the dead of winter, fans eagerly anticipate – sunny skies, swaying palm trees, green grass and fastballs. Assuming the games are played, bring your wallet. The well-heeled Yankees charge $100 for standing room tickets.

Dinosaur fans remember a happier era when the months leading up to Spring Training were about baseball, not lockouts. No fans had the months between February and April better than Brooklyn Dodgers’ rooters who visited Dodgertown, in Vero Beach, Fla.

In his book, “Dodgertown,” author Mark Langill described how the camp became the fruition of team executive Branch Rickey’s long-time dream to bring his players together in a single, top-notch training facility so that all the Dodgers – regulars and minor leaguers – could be evaluated at the same time. Vero Beach, with its vacant, post-World War II Naval facility, was the perfect place. Dodgertown provided dozens of batting cages, two mechanical pitchers, an electric eye umpire that also measured the velocity of each pitch, a sliding pit and a track coach. Some of those baseball-oriented features were Rickey’s innovations. Off the field, the Dodgers kept their players occupied and happy by providing jukeboxes, shuffleboard, horseshoes, croquet and pinball machines. Food was readily and abundantly available. “Take all you want, but eat all you take,” read the cafeteria sign.

But just as the Dodgers left Brooklyn in 1957 for Los Angeles’ lucre, they abandoned Vero Beach in 2009 for the more profitable Camelback Ranch. The Arizona facility offers tourists more than 150 Dodgers caps for sums that range up to $65.00. Those lordly prices help explain why the Dodgers franchise has $3.6 billion value, and why baseball fans are turned off.

Joe Guzzardi is a Society for American Baseball Research and an Internet Baseball Writers Association member. Contact him at guzzjoe@yahoo.com.

MLB Lockout Is Billionaires Versus Multimillionaires MLB Lockout Is Billionaires Versus Multimillionaires