Utility Pole Planter

Utility Pole PlanterAn old utility pole makes for an interesting and delightful planter that is sure to be the talk of the neighborhood — especially if you can find one with the hand holds.

To make one, first find a utility pole. This is much more difficult than it sounds. While utility poles are quite common — one may be as close as your sidewalk — cutting one down is very illegal and doing so could result in arrest, fines, restitution, and possibly even a jail sentence.

That’s assuming you survive the electric shock.

A good way to acquire one is wait for a major storm and have it fall on your classic car. Utility Pole Planter Monte Carlo

Then wait for the emergency crew to turn off the power to it, cut it up and leave it as they have no room for it on their truck. Pick an appropriate sized piece, dig a hole a foot or so deep, put the pole in it, hang some begonias on the hand holds and voila you’re the envy of the community.

Utility Pole Planter

7 thoughts on “Utility Pole Planter”

  1. I can hardly wait for the next utility pole knocking down storm and then I will compete with an English Country Garden

    You ask., how many kinds of sweet flowers grow
    In an English country garden?
    We’ll tell you now of some that we know
    Those we miss you’ll surely pardon
    Daffodils, heart’s ease and flox
    Meadowsweet and lady smocks
    Gentian, lupine and tall hollihocks
    Roses, foxgloves, snowdrops, blue forget-me-nots
    In an English country garden.
    I can hardly wait. Hurry up storm.

    1. We used to sing that song many years ago when I was a pupil in Roebling (NJ) elementary School. It was one of my favorites. Do you have rest of it?

      1. Sure> It was one of my favorites in grammar school too> Here’s the rest of it:

        How many insects come here and go
        In an English country garden?
        We’ll tell you now of some that we know
        Those we miss you’ll surely pardon
        Fireflies, moths, gnats and bees
        Spiders climbing in the trees
        Butterflies drift in the gentle breeze
        There are snakes, ants that sting
        And other creeping things
        In an English country garden

        How many songbirds fly to and fro
        In an English country garden?
        We’ll tell you now of some that we know
        Those we miss you’ll surely pardon
        Bobolink, cuckoo and quail
        Tanager and cardinal
        Bluebird, lark, thrush and nightingale
        There is joy in the spring
        When the birds begin to sing
        In an English country garden

        How many kinds of sweet flowers grow
        In an English country garden?
        We’ll tell you now of some that we know
        Those we miss you’ll surely pardon
        Daffodils, heart’s ease and flox
        Meadowsweet and lady smocks
        Gentain, lupine and tall hollihocks
        Roses, foxgloves, snowdrops, blue forget-me-nots
        In an English country garden

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