William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 10-23-17

Paul Gauguin Panama Canal — The painter Paul Gauguin was a laborer on the Panama Canal — the unsuccessful French one.

He was arrested for urinating in public in Panama City and marched at gunpoint to the courthouse where he was made to pay a one piastre or about 80 cents.

He left soon after.

 

Paul Gauguin Panama Canal William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 10-23-17

Paul Gauguin Panama Canal -- The painter Paul Gauguin was a laborer on the Panama Canal -- the unsuccessful French one.

Matt Damon School Choice Film Screening Nov. 2

Matt Damon School Choice Film Screening Nov. 2 — A film concerning school choice will be aired, 7 p.m., Nov. 2 at the Bryn Mawr Church of the Redeemer, 230 Pennswood Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 19010. It’s called Backpack Full of Cash and will be narrated by noted Hollywood star, Harvey-Weinstein enabler and Howard Zinn fan Matt Damon.

The tagline is “Why are vouchers and school choice killers of local public schools?”

Attend if you can. As Joanne Yurchak wisely notes conversation is good.

The event is free and sponsored by Parents Across America — Suburban Philadelphia, and the Moms’ Group of Bryn Mawr Church of the Redeemer.

 

Matt Damon School Choice Film Screening Nov. 2

Matt Damon School Choice Film Airing Nov. 2

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 10-23-17

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 10-23-17

Zsaw qehi mr wxsvqw evi jsvksxxir mr gepqw.
Xlsqew Jyppiv

Sweet is the sleep of laborers, whether they eat little or much; but the surfeit of the rich will not let them sleep. Ecclesiastes Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth. Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day. PsalmsAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: Sweet is the sleep of laborers, whether they eat little or much; but the surfeit of the rich will not let them sleep.
Ecclesiastes

 

Check out the Dom Giordano Show on WPHT 1210 AM

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 10-22-17

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 10-22-17

Vzhhw lv wkh vohhs ri oderuhuv, zkhwkhu wkhb hdw olwwoh ru pxfk; exw wkh vxuihlw ri wkh ulfk zloo qrw ohw wkhp vohhs.
Hffohvldvwhv

Happy Birthday, Robert James Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth. Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day. PsalmsAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: Happy Birthday, Robert James

 

Read Phil Heron at the Delaware County Daily Times

Protests Bringing NFL To Its Knees

Protests Bringing NFL To Its Knees

By Chris Freind Protests Bringing NFL To Its Knees

To kneel, or not to kneel. That is the question.

It’s an issue that has become the biggest political football in NFL history, with implications so far-reaching that the league could find itself sacked for a huge loss if it doesn’t call the right play.

Kneeling during the national anthem, originally an act to protest alleged racism within the ranks of America’s police, has been met with counter-protests, from Vice President Mike Pence walking out when players knelt, to fan boycotts of games, merchandise and league sponsors.

That’s a lot of protests protesting other protests.

With both sides digging in deeper, and President Trump showing no signs of backing down from his position that protesting players should be suspended or fired, this issue will be in prime time for quite a while.

Here are some aspects being drowned out by the white noise:

1. Leave it to the Trump Administration to fumble a winning issue when it should have scored easily. Virtually every poll, official and anecdotal alike, shows a majority of Americans disapprove of NFL players kneeling during, or not appearing for, the national anthem. So what did the White House do to capitalize on that sentiment? It had the Veep very publicly storm out of a game when players took a knee. Had Mr. Pence’s action been impromptu, it would have generated significant support. But because he told the press that he would return to his motorcade shortly after entering the game – thereby demonstrating that his plan was nothing more than a calculated gimmick – his decision was roundly ridiculed. It was par for the course for an administration that can’t get out of its own way, even on issues supported by most Americans.

Political stunts don’t win hearts and minds. Genuine leadership does – a winning formula for which the White House still needs significantly better coaching.

2. Despite addressing the First Amendment/anthem issue several weeks ago, some readers continue to misinterpret a key point about freedom of expression. So to reiterate: Unequivocally, NFL players operating during work hours do not have a “right” to protest, regardless of how important they believe an issue to be. People must understand that a player’s fame and very public platform, while powerful, does not put him above the law. In other words, he must follow workplace rules in exactly the same way that employees in every other profession do. Those who disagree simply do not understand employment law.

From uniform regulations to punctuality to conduct, teams set rules. Fail to comply, and there are consequences.

Bottom line: if the NFL or individual teams allow players to protest the anthem, so be it. That is their decision, and they, as private entities, and only they, have the right to make that call. Likewise, if they choose to mandate participation, the players would have a contractual obligation to comply. Therefore, protesting the anthem (or the protest du jour) is a workplace privilege afforded to players by the team owner. But it is not a “right.”

The term “my right” has been bandied around so often – most of the time incorrectly – that it has served only to embolden an already-entitled generation to think they can do and say whatever they please while “on the clock,” with no repercussions. They can’t.

3. Former San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who initiated the anthem protest last year, filed a grievance against the NFL, alleging that owners are colluding to keep him unemployed. It is a case Kaepernick has virtually no chance of winning, because he doesn’t understand that the NFL cares about only two things: winning games and making money. Sure, Commissioner Roger Goodell likes to dabble in politically correct, social engineering issues (such as transgender bathrooms), but his primary focus is making the league and its owners as much money as possible.

Translation: Owners don’t want to pay millions to a political crusader like Kaepernick, not just because his cause is extremely divisive to fans and spills into the locker room, but more important, it doesn’t win football games. That doesn’t mean Kaepernick won’t be signed (though let’s not forget that it was he who walked away from his contract). If he is, it’ll be because a team thinks it needs his abilities, diminished as they are. But Kaepernick’s banishment to the sidelines isn’t collusion. It’s common sense by owners, and a situation entirely of his own making.

4. It’s not without irony that the Confederate flag, which has been under withering attack lately, was defeated by forces representing the Stars and Stripes. Yet now, players whose freedom and wealth directly result from Old Glory, see fit to turn their backs on it. Protesting racism in all its forms is laudable, but they are picking the worst way to do so.

5. Commissioner Goodell and some owners, just weeks after basking in attention when so many teams took a knee, have abruptly reversed course. Now, they are contemplating a rule mandating anthem participation. If they follow through, it will be the right thing for the wrong reason, since their motivation is primarily about the almighty dollar. And for good reason: ratings and attendance have been plummeting, even before the anthem controversy.

Why? Mostly because the NFL has become an inferior product. Fans are sick of “all-about-me” players dueling to perform the most insulting antic after a touchdown (such as pretending to urinate on a fire hydrant), despite their team being down by 30. Add in steroid use, drug arrests, DUIs, assaults, domestic violence, and even murders, combined with fewer children playing, and you have the recipe for a dying game.

The league has done some incredibly stupid things, but the commissioner and owners are smart enough to know that, if they don’t handle the anthem issue correctly, it could become the sack from which they can’t recover.

6. Many protesters have been using the rallying cry: “If you’re not protesting, you’re not paying attention.”

Fair enough.

So let’s talk about realities. Is there racism within some police forces? Absolutely. Is it endemic? Absolutely not, and nowhere near the levels of decades ago. But we must be honest that racism comes in all colors: white cops not liking blacks, black cops resenting whites, Hispanic cops not approving of some other ethnicities, etc. All racism should be purged, but it is critical to remember that the percentage of police officers falling into that category is extremely small, probably lower than in most other jobs.

Many protesters fail to see that their lack of credibility is tied to a narrative that changes oh-so-conveniently. If a white cop shoots a black man, he’s labeled “racist.” But if a black officer shoots a black man, he’s either a “sellout to his people” or, by default, the entire force is racist. Sorry, you can’t have it both ways.

When protests erupt after a shooting, two things are almost always true: A) the shooting was justified (and, as in Ferguson, had nothing to do with race), or B) it was questionable but legal, the result of an officer’s less-than-ideal judgment in a difficult situation. On the rare occasions when it is a bad shoot, officers rightfully face the full weight of the law.

Truth is, racism is almost never a factor in shootings because it makes no sense. Who goes on patrol with the intent to target black people, rough them up, and, when they move, blast away? No one. And that’s not just because it’s wrong, but because the price is too high: job loss; unemployability; prison time; wrecked families; and death threats. Again, that doesn’t mean the bad apples shouldn’t be removed. But focusing so much energy on “racist police” is largely a waste, as it deflects attention from more relevant issues.

Pushing for better training and procedures is one thing. But to broadly label as “racist” America’s men and women in blue, and the prosecutors who exonerate them after justified shootings, is inexcusable.

If NFL players took a knee to honor those who catch bullets instead of passes, and tackle criminals instead of millionaire players, it would be the best play call they’d ever make.

 

Protests Bringing NFL To Its Knees

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 10-21-17

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 10-21-17

Gzoox Ahqsgczx, Qnadqs Izldr

liberal friends is not that they're ignorant; it's just that they know so much that isn't so. Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth. Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day. PsalmsAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they’re ignorant; it’s just that they know so much that isn’t so.
Ronald Reagan

 

Check out Kim Kennedy’s It’s A New Day on WFYL 1180 AM

William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 10-20-17

The French still use the Maginot Line, at least part of it. Ouvrage Hochwald is a hardened command center for Drachebronn Air Base.

The French actually re-manned the line after World War II — an event in which it infamously failed — and used it as originally intended until the 1960s when they developed an independent nuclear deterrent.

One of the forts was used as the set for SPECTRE headquarters in the James Bond film On Her Majesty’s Secret Service.

Ouvrage Hochwald William Lawrence Sr Omnibit 10-20-17

The French still use the Maginot Line, at least part of it. Ouvrage Hochwald is a hardened command center for Drachebronn Air Base.

Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention Proposed

Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention Proposed

By Leo Knepper

On Oct. 17, Senator John Eichelberger and Representative Stephen Bloom introduced legislation to enable a limited state constitutional convention. We are proud to count Sen. Eichelberger and Rep. Bloom as CAP members. The legislation that they’ve crafted will go a long way to reforming the dysfunctional government saddling the taxpayers of the Commonwealth. Their press statement on the legislation makes an effective case for its rational and lays out the basics of how a convention would operate:

“Pennsylvanians deserve better,” said Senator Eichelberger. “They’re fed up with the inability of the General Assembly, on the whole, to address significant deficiencies in several key areas of the state government. A limited constitutional convention could lead to significant reform and go a long way in restoring the public’s faith in a system that has been failing them.”

“Senate Bill 867, sponsored by Senator Eichelberger, and House Bill 1967, sponsored by Representative Bloom, will allow the public to vote in an upcoming election on whether or not there should be a constitutional convention limited to very specific topics.  Those topics include proposed changes to the terms and size of the General Assembly; spending without an enacted budget; the office of the Lieutenant Governor; and the judiciary.

“A constitutional convention would be an opportunity for citizens who are frustrated with our broken state government to take a very direct role in historic government change,” said Representative Bloom.

If the majority of voters approve, a preparatory committee would immediately make logistical arrangements for holding the convention.  The convention would consist of 163 members – three delegates elected from each of the senatorial districts and 13 other members who would consist of members of the General Assembly and be ex-officio members. Convention delegates would vote on recommended changes to the state constitution.  All recommendations would require a majority vote of the 163 delegates.  Proposed changes in the form of ballot questions would be placed on the ballot for final approval or rejection by the voters.

The text of the Senate bill can be found here. As Sen. Eichelberger and Rep. Bloom noted at their press conference, the scope of the convention will be limited to the Articles affecting the legislature, legislation, the executive, and judicial branch. None of the sections on basic rights of citizens (i.e. firearms) would be open for discussion. We will keep you posted about this important legislation as it progresses.

Mr. Knepper is executive director of Citizens Alliance of Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention Proposed By Leo Knepper On Oct. 17, Senator John Eichelberger and Representative Stephen Bloom introduced legislation to enable a limited state constitutional convention.

 

Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention Proposed

 

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 10-20-17

William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit 10-20-17

Rfc rpmszjc ugrf msp jgzcpyj dpgclbq gq lmr rfyr rfcw’pc gelmpylr; gr’q hsqr rfyr rfcw ilmu qm ksaf rfyr gql’r qm.
Pmlyjb Pcyeyl

We must not only cease our present desire for the growth of the state, but we must desire its decrease, its weakening. Leo Tolstoy Sing ye to the Lord a new canticle: sing to the Lord, all the earth. Sing ye to the Lord and bless his name: shew forth his salvation from day to day. PsalmsAnswer to yesterday’s William Lawrence Sr Cryptowit quote puzzle: We must not only cease our present desire for the growth of the state, but we must desire its decrease, its weakening.
Leo Tolstoy

 

Read Phil Heron at the Delaware County Daily Times